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A supporter wears a cloth wrap showing Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta, with writing in Swahili reading "President Uhuru, Five More" referring to the wish for another 5-year term, at an election rally in Uhuru Park in Nairobi, Kenya Friday, Aug. 4, 2017. Kenyans are due to go to the polls on Aug. 8. to vote in presidential elections after a tightly-fought race between incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta and main opposition leader Raila Odinga.

Ben Curtis/AP Photo

A U.S.-based campaign data company says a Canadian staffer and the company's CEO were detained in Kenya and face deportation after working on the opposition's campaign.

Brandi Travis of Aristotle, Inc. says CEO John Aristotle Phillips, an American, and Canadian staffer Andreas Katsouris were detained Friday night and face deportation later Saturday.

Travis says the two men were assisting opposition candidate Raila Odinga with issues including strategy and data analysis and had chosen to get involved in the Kenyan election because they thought it had the potential for irregularities.

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Today is the last day of campaigning before the highly-contested election, which is scheduled for Tuesday.

President Uhuru Kenyatta faces longtime opposition leader Odinga, whose supporters gathered for a final rally in Nairobi, the capital.

Kenyatta is the son of Kenya's first president; Odinga is the son of the country's first vice-president and has run in vain for the top post in three previous contests.

Recent elections in the East African high-tech and commercial hub have been hotly contested, and more than 1,000 people were killed in post-election violence a decade ago. Kenyatta prevailed over Odinga in a 2013 vote that was mostly peaceful but tainted by opposition allegations of vote-rigging.

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