Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

Citizens celebrate as Uruguay approves same-sex marriage

The Latin American nation of 3.3 million became the second in the region to adopt the measure, after its neighbour Argentina

1 of 7

Uruguayan citizens celebrate in the Congress building after Uruguay's Congress passed a bill to allow same-sex marriages, making it the second country in predominantly Roman Catholic Latin America to do so April 10, 2013. Seventy-one of 92 lawmakers in the lower house of Congress voted in favor of the proposal, one week after the Senate passed it by a wide majority.

ANDRES STAPFF/REUTERS

2 of 7

Uruguayan citizens celebrate in the Congress building after Uruguay's Congress passed a bill to allow same-sex marriages, making it the second country in predominantly Roman Catholic Latin America to do so, April 10, 2013.

ANDRES STAPFF/REUTERS

3 of 7

Uruguayan citizens celebrate in the Congress building after Uruguay's Congress passed a bill to allow same-sex marriages, making it the second country in predominantly Roman Catholic Latin America to do so, April 10, 2013.

ANDRES STAPFF/REUTERS

4 of 7

A couple waits outside the Congress building before Uruguay's Congress passed a bill to allow same-sex marriages, making it the second country in predominantly Roman Catholic Latin America to do so, April 10, 2013.

ANDRES STAPFF/REUTERS

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 7

People wait outside the Congress building before Uruguay's Congress passed a bill to allow same-sex marriages, making it the second country in predominantly Roman Catholic Latin America to do so, April 10, 2013.

ANDRES STAPFF/REUTERS

6 of 7

People look on as Uruguay's Congress discussed a bill to allow same-sex marriages, making it the second country in predominantly Roman Catholic Latin America to do so April 10, 2013.

ANDRES STAPFF/REUTERS

7 of 7

A couple celebrates outside the Congress building after Uruguay's Congress passed a bill to allow same-sex marriages, making it the second country in predominantly Roman Catholic Latin America to do so April 10, 2013. Seventy-one of 92 lawmakers in the lower house of Congress voted in favor of the proposal, one week after the Senate passed it by a wide majority. Leftist President Jose Mujica, a former guerrilla fighter, is expected to sign the bill into law.

ANDRES STAPFF/REUTERS

Report an error