Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

Criminal probe opened into eight deaths at Florida nursing home after Irma

Damaged houses are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on September 11, 2017 over the Florida Keys, Florida.

Pool/Getty Images

Eight elderly patients died after being left inside a stifling South Florida nursing home that lost power during Hurricane Irma, officials said on Wednesday, prompting a criminal investigation that has compounded a mounting loss of life from the storm.

The overall death toll from Irma climbed to 81 on Wednesday, with several hard-hit Caribbean islands accounting for more than half the fatalities, and officials continued to assess damage inflicted by the second major hurricane to strike the U.S. mainland this year.

Irma killed at least 31 people in Florida, plus seven more in Georgia and South Carolina combined, authorities said.

Story continues below advertisement

Irma's aftermath: A guide to the hurricane damage in Florida and beyond

One of the most powerful Atlantic storms on record, Irma bore down on the Caribbean with devastating force as it raked the northern shore of Cuba last week before barreling into the Florida Keys island chain on Sunday, packing sustained winds of up to 130 miles per hour (215 km per hour). It then plowed north up the Gulf Coast of the state before dissipating.

Video: Canada assessing Caribbean aid needs after Hurricane Irma (The Canadian Press)

In addition to severe flooding across Florida and extensive property damage in the Keys, one of the chief hardships facing Floridians has been widespread power outages that initially plunged more than half the state into darkness.

Some 4.3 million homes and businesses were still without power on Wednesday in Florida and neighboring states, down from a peak outage tally of 7.4 million customers on Monday.

Outages had fatal consequences at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hill, a nursing home in Hollywood, Florida, north of Miami. Three elderly residents were found dead on Wednesday inside the sweltering facility, which had been operating with little or no air conditioning, officials said.

Four more patients died at or en route to a nearby hospital and a fifth was later identified as having died the night before, bringing the tally of those who perished to eight, the city said.

Governor Rick Scott called the tragedy "unfathomable" and vowed to "aggressively demand answers." Police said they have sealed off the building and opened a criminal probe after the remaining nursing home patients were transferred to neighboring hospitals.

Story continues below advertisement

City officials described the interior of the building as "excessively hot."

The eight who died ranged in age from 71 to 99, according to the Broward County medical examiner's office. The cause of their deaths has yet to be determined.

But most of the surviving patients were treated for "respiratory distress, dehydration and heat-related issues," Memorial Regional Hospital's emergency medical director, Dr. Randy Katz, told reporters.

Fire and rescue teams were first called to the facility at about 3 a.m. for a patient reported in cardiac arrest, and firefighters returned an hour later for a resident with breathing difficulties, the city said.

As additional patients were found in distress, police and doctors from Memorial Hospital finally decided to evacuate the entire nursing home at about 6 a.m., according to accounts from Katz and Hollywood Police Chief Tomas Sanchez. Katz called the situation "chaotic."

Florida Power & Light provided electricity to parts of the nursing home but the facility was not on a county top-tier list for emergency power restoration, the utility said.

Story continues below advertisement

TRUMP TO VISIT KEYS

Total insured losses from the storm are expected to run about $25-billion, including $18-billion in the United States and $7-billion in the Caribbean, catastrophe modeler Karen Clark & Company estimated on Wednesday.

The Florida Keys were particularly hard hit, with federal officials saying 90 percent of its homes were destroyed or heavily damaged. The remote island chain stretches nearly 100 miles (160 km) into the Gulf of Mexico from Florida's southern tip, connected by a single highway and series of bridges.

On Key West, at the end of the archipelago, hundreds of residents who had refused evacuation orders lined up on Wednesday outside the island's Salvation Army outpost for water and military-style rations after enduring days of intense heat with little water, power or contact with the outside world.

The stench of dead fish and decaying seaweed permeated the air.

Elizabeth Martinez, 61, said the ordeal, including losing part of the roof of her home, had convinced her it was time to leave the island. "I'm saving my money up and moving out of here," she said.

But David Sheidy, a 58-year-old painter, predicted Key West would bounce back quickly.

"That's what we do," he said. "This is a small community where everybody knows each other and takes care of each other."

President Donald Trump is due to visit Florida on Thursday.

Irma wreaked utter devastation on several of the northern Leeward Islands of the Caribbean, where at least 43 people have died.

Irma hit the United States about two weeks after Hurricane Harvey plowed into Houston, killing about 60 and causing some $180-billion in damage, mostly from flooding.

Report an error
Comments

The Globe invites you to share your views. Please stay on topic and be respectful to everyone. For more information on our commenting policies and how our community-based moderation works, please read our Community Guidelines and our Terms and Conditions.

We’ve made some technical updates to our commenting software. If you are experiencing any issues posting comments, simply log out and log back in.

Discussion loading… ✨

Combined Shape Created with Sketch.

Combined Shape Created with Sketch.

Thank you!

You are now subscribed to the newsletter at

You can unsubscribe from this newsletter or Globe promotions at any time by clicking the link at the bottom of the newsletter, or by emailing us at privacy@globeandmail.com.