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In photos: 20 young children, six educators and one mother, lost in the Sandy Hook shootings

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Allison Wyatt, 6, was a kind-hearted little girl who formed special bonds with almost everyone she met. She’d surprise her family with her random acts of kindness – once even offering her snacks to a stranger on a plane, her family recalled.

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Madeleine F. Hsu, 6, was shy and quiet – but she would light up around dogs. Karen Dryer, who lived on the same street as the Hsu family, would see Madeleine’s mom waiting for her at the bus stop at 3:15 every afternoon. “She would come off the bus and her face would light up when she saw the dog,” Ms. Dryer said.

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The death of James Mattioli, 6, weighs heavy on the town of Sherrill in upstate New York, where his mother grew up. ‘It’s a terrible tragedy, and we’re a tight community,’ the mayor said. ‘Everybody will be there for them, and our thoughts and prayers are there for them.’

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Jessica Rekos, 6, was among the 20 children killed. Little else is known about her yet.

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Charlotte Bacon, 6, was allowed to wear her new pink holiday dress to school Friday, after much begging. It was the last outfit the outgoing redhead would ever pick out. Charlotte’s older brother, Guy, was also in the school but was not shot.

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Chase Kowalski, 7, was always outside, playing in the backyard, riding his bicycle. Just last week, he was visiting a neighbour telling him about completing — and winning — his first mini-triathlon.

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Olivia Engel, 6, was excited to go to school Friday and then return home and make a gingerbread house. “She loved attention,” a family friend said. “She had perfect manners, perfect table manners. She was the teacher’s pet.”

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Jessie Lewis, 6, had hot chocolate with his favourite breakfast sandwich — sausage, egg and cheese — at the neighbourhood deli before going to school Friday morning. His family has a collection of animals he enjoyed playing with, and he was learning to ride horseback.

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Josephine Gay, 7, was among the 20 children killed. Little else is known about her yet.

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Grace McDonnell, 6, was ‘like a little doll. She was utterly adorable,’ a neighbour said.

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Noah Pozner, 6, was ‘smart as a whip,’ gentle but with a rambunctious streak. His twin sister Arielle, assigned to a different classroom, survived the shooting. He called her his best friend, and with their 8-year-old sister, Sophia, they were inseparable.

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Ana Marquez-Greene, 6, moved to Connecticut just two months ago, drawn from Winnipeg, in part, by the sterling reputation of the Sandy Hook school. A video spreading across the Internet shows a confident Ana hitting every note as she sings ‘Come, Thou Almighty King.’ She flashes a big grin and waves to the camera when she's done.

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Caroline Previdi, 6, was among the 20 children killed. Little else is known about her yet.

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Emilie Parker, 6, was quick to cheer up those in need of a smile, never missing a chance to draw a picture or make a card. The always-smiling girl who loved to try new things, except foods.

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Avielle Richman, 6, was one of the 20 children killed. Little else is known about her yet.

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Jack Pinto was one of the 20 children killed. Little else is known about him yet.

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Dylan Hockley, 6, was one of the 20 children killed. Little else is known about him yet.

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Catherine Hubbard, 6, one of the 20 children killed. Little else is known about her yet

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Benjamin Wheeler, 6, was one of the 20 children killed. Little else is known about her yet.

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Daniel Barden, 7, was one of the 20 children killed. Little else is known about her yet.

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Teacher Victoria Soto, 27, beams in snapshots. Her enthusiasm and cheer was evident. Those who knew her said they weren’t surprised by reports she shielded her first-graders from danger.

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Principal Dawn Hochsprung, 47, was clearly proud of Sandy Hook Elementary. She regularly tweeted photos from her time as principal there, giving indelible glimpses of life at a place now known for tragedy. Officials said she died while lunging at the gunman in an attempt to overtake him.

Eliza Hallabeck/AP

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School psychologist Mary Sherlach, 56, is seen here with her husband, Mark. Together with principal Dawn Hochsprung, she ran toward the shooter, and lost her life rushing toward him. Even as her retirement reared, her job at Sandy Hook was one she loved. Those who knew her called her a wonderful neighbour, a beautiful person, a dedicated educator.

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Lauren Rousseau, 30, had spent years working as a substitute teacher. So she was thrilled when she finally realized her goal this fall to become a full-time teacher at Sandy Hook. Her mother said she was thrilled to get the job. “It was the best year of her life,” she said.

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Anne Marie Murphy, 52, was a teacher at Sandy Hook. Little else is known about her yet.

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Rachel Davino, 29, was a teacher at Sandy Hook Elementary. Little else is known about her yet.

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Nancy Lanza, 52, once was known simply for the game nights she hosted and the holiday decorations she put up at her house. Now Ms. Lanza, a former stockbroker at John Hancock in Boston, is known as her son’s first victim.

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