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In photos: Seven global tributes to Australia and New Zealand's wartime sacrifice

ANZAC day marks anniversary of Australian and New Zealand Army Corps' bloody 1915 battle in Turkey

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William and Catherine, Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, place poppies into the World War I Wall of Remembrance during their visit at the Australian National War Memorial in Canberra. ANZAC Day was the final day of the royals' tour of Australia and New Zealand with their son, Prince George.

JASON REED/ASSOCIATED PRESS

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The shadow of an Australian soldier is cast on a monument for fallen soldiers during the wreath-laying ceremonies at the Australian National Memorial in Villers-Bretonneux, northern France.

MICHEL SPINGLER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Chief of the Royal Australian Navy, Vice-Admiral Ray Griggs, holds a poppy wreath during Anzac Day services at the Australian International School, where there is a dedicated Anzac memorial, in Hong Kong.

TYRONE SIU/REUTERS

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Visitors from Australia and New Zealand attend a dawn ceremony marking the 99th anniversary of the Gallipoli campaign on April 25, 2014, at Anzac Cove, where the first battles of the campaign were fought. Some 4,000 Australian and New Zealand soldiers struggled ashore on this narrow beach in the ill-fated campaign that would claim more than 130,000 lives.

UMIT BEKTAS/REUTERS

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A girl leaps over headstones at the Jakarta War Cemetery following the ANZAC Day dawn service.

MARK BAKER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Head of the New Zealand Defense Staff Brigadier Anthony Hayward, left, and Head of the Australian Defense Staff Brigadier Bill Sowry salute after laying wreaths beside the Australian War Memorial in London.

MATT DUNHAM/ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Attendees hold candles and an Australian national flag during a dawn memorial service for soldiers who died during the Second World War at Hellfire Pass in Kanchanaburi province, west of Bangkok. The dawn ceremony was held for the prisoners of war who were forced to work and died on the Burma-Siam railway during the Japanese occupation.

DARREN WHITESIDE/REUTERS

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