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In pictures: In Sevastopol, rival fleets maintain uneasy stand-off

The strategic Crimean port of Sevastopol is home to both the Ukrainian navy and Russia's Black Sea Fleet. As tensions rise, the two forces are standing down - for now.

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A Ukrainian sailor smiles as he looks out of a window near the entrance to the General Staff Headquarters of the Ukrainian Navy, as an unidentified soldier stands outside in Sevastopol, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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The new commander of the Naval forces of Ukraine, Rear Admiral Sergei Gaiduk, speaks inside the General Staff of the Ukrainian Navy in Sevastopol, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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The Russian minesweeper "Turbinist" is seen at the harbour of Sevastopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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Ukrainian seamen stand guard on the Ukrainian navy ship Slavutich in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 3, 2014. The Ukrainian Defense Ministry said that Russian forces that have overtaken Ukraine's strategic region of Crimea are demanding that the ship's crew surrender.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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Ukrainian seamen stand guard on the Ukrainian navy ship Slavutich in Sevastopol, Monday March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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The Ukrainian national flag flies from the Ukrainian navy ship Slavutich in Sevastopol harbour, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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People stand on board the Ukrainian navy corvette Ternopil in Sevastopol harbour, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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People look at the Ukrainian navy ship Slavutich in Sevastopol harbour, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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The Ukrainian navy ship Slavutich is seen in the port of Sevastopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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Ukrainian seamen stand guard on the Ukrainian navy ship Slavutich in Sevastopol harbour, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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Ukrainian seamen stand guard on the Ukrainian navy ship Slavutich in Sevastopol harbour, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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Ukrainian soldiers gather near the bath house in the General Staff Headquarters of the Ukrainian Navy in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 3, 2014. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on Monday justified the use of Russian troops streaming into neighboring Ukraine's Crimea region as a necessary protection for his country's citizens living there.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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Unidentified gunmen stand outside entrance to the General Staff Headquarters of the Ukrainian Navy in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 3, 2014. Pro-Russian soldiers moved to further cement their control over the strategic region, that also houses the Russian Black Sea Fleet, by seizing a ferry terminal in the Ukrainian city of Kerch about 20 kilometers by boat to Russia, intensifying fears that Moscow will send even more troops into the peninsula.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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People walk outside the General Staff Headquarters of the Ukrainian Navy as unidentified gunmen stand outside it in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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A man wearing the Russian national flag walks past an entrance to the General Staff Headquarters of the Ukrainian Navy as unidentified gunmen stand outside in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 3, 2014.

Andrew Lubimov/AP

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