Skip to main content

1 of 7

People protesting the disappearance of their family members in recent years, hold a demonstration in downtown Mexico City. Thousands of people, mostly young man, have disappeared since the beginning of the war on drugs declared by Mexican president Felipe Calderon when he assumed he assumed office on 2006.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

2 of 7

Monica Heredia, whose husband Filiberto Guzman Morales disappeared on December 2009 in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico photographed in Mexico City. Morales had been hired by a telecommunications outsourcing firm on behalf of Nokia to install a cell phone network in Nuevo Laredo. The city is just across the border from across from Laredo, Texas, and is known as a lucrative drug smuggling corridor -- so dangerous the local newspaper recently declared it will no longer cover the vicious turf battle between the Sinaloan Cartel and the Zetas.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

3 of 7

Patricia Manzanares Ochoa shows a picture of her son Juan Hernandez, a police officer who disappeared from a police station in February 2011 in Nuevo Leon, Mexico. In 2011, Hernandez second year in the force, Mr. Hernandez was sent to San Nicolas de los Garza, in Monterrey, an area embroiled in a brutal wave of violence as Los Zetas fought rival cartels for control of the smuggling corridor. Mr. Hernandez was last seen late on Feb. 20 inside the 88 Inn, the hotel where the police were staying.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

4 of 7

Maria Guadalupe Fernandez Martinez and her husband Antonio Robledo Chavarria show a picture of their son Antonio Robledo Fernandez who disappeared in January 2009 in the Mexican state of Coahuila. A civil engineer, Antonio Robledo Fernandez worked as a supervisor at ICA Fluor Daniel, a construction conglomerate. Three years ago, he took a contract job up in Moncloa, Coahuila, building furnaces for Altos Hornos de Mexico S.A. He was last seen alive Sunday Jan. 25, 2009.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 7

Juan Manuel Duarte and his wife Maria Del Carmen Cruz, wear pictures of their son Angel Duarte who disappeared on March 21, 2011 after being kidnaped from the bus he was riding in the state of Guanajuato. Mexico city May 10, 2012.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

6 of 7

Marina Armenta, whose husband Eduardo Toyota Espinoza disappeared in Jun 2009 in the town of Nuevo Laredo in the north of Mexico, photographed while holding a picture of her him in Mexico City, May 13, 2012.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

7 of 7

People protesting the disappearance of their family members in recent years, hold a demonstration in downtown Mexico City. Thousands of people, mostly young man, have disappeared since the beginning of the war on drugs declared by Mexican president Felipe Calderon when he assumed he assumed office on 2006.

Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail

Report an error
Combined Shape Created with Sketch.

Combined Shape Created with Sketch.

Thank you!

You are now subscribed to the newsletter at

You can unsubscribe from this newsletter or Globe promotions at any time by clicking the link at the bottom of the newsletter, or by emailing us at privacy@globeandmail.com.