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The chief of Thailand's military has announced a takeover of the country's administration in a bid to restore order after months of confrontation and instability

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Thai soldiers stand guard at the Army Club where Thailand's army chief holds a meeting with groups and organizations with a central role in the crisis, in central Bangkok May 22, 2014.

ATHIT PERAWONGMETHA/REUTERS

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A tourist walks past Thai soldiers guard on a street in Bangkok, Thursday, May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-Ocha assumed the role of mediator Wednesday by summoning the country's key political rivals for face-to-face talks one day after imposing martial law. The meeting ended without any resolution, however, underscoring the profound challenge the army faces in trying to end the country's crisis.

Sakchai Lalit/AP

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Thai soldiers gather while waiting for an order at the Army Club in Bangkok, Thursday, May 22, 2014. The opponents in Thailand's polarizing political crisis met Thursday for a second round of talks mediated by the country's army chief, who says he invoked martial law and then summoned the bitter rivals to try to end six months of turmoil.

Apichart Weerawong/AP

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Thai soldiers patrol on a street near a rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thursday, May 22, 2014.

Wason Wanichakorn/AP

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A woman walks past Thai soldiers providing security on an overpass near a rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thursday, May 22, 2014.

Wason Wanichakorn/AP

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Thai soldiers stand guard at the Army Club where Thailand's army chief holds a meeting with groups and organizations with a central role in the crisis, in central Bangkok May 22, 2014.

ATHIT PERAWONGMETHA/REUTERS

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Thai soldiers patrol on foot on a road near the rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thursday, May 22, 2014.

Wason Wanichakorn/AP

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Anti-government protesters gather near Government House in Bangkok, Thursday, May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief announced a military takeover of the government Thursday, saying the coup was necessary to restore stability and order after six months of political deadlock and turmoil.

Sakchai Lalit/AP

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Thai women walk past Thai soldiers standing guard outside an area occupied by anti-government protesters Thursday, May 22, 2014, in Bangkok.

Sakchai Lalit/AP

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A Thai soldier stops a motorcycle taxi while standing guard outside an area occupied by anti-government protesters Thursday, May 22, 2014, in Bangkok.

Sakchai Lalit/AP

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Thai and foreign journalists watch and listen to the announcement of the Thai Armed Forces chiefs on the coup through television at the press centre at the Army Club in Bangkok, Thursday, May 22, 2014.

Apichart Weerawong/AP

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A passerby, right, walks past a Thai soldier guarding an overpass near a rally site for pro-government demonstrators on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thursday, May 22, 2014.

Wason Wanichakorn/AP

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