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In pictures: Ukrainian rebels turn over black boxes

Controversy continues over access to crash site amid concerns over integrity of evidence

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A Malaysian expert (left) examines a black box belonging to Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 during its handover from pro-Russian separatists, in Donetsk July 22, 2014. The remains of some of the 298 victims of the Malaysia Airlines plane downed over Ukraine were making their way to the Netherlands on Tuesday as Senior Ukrainian separatist leader Aleksander Borodai handed over the plane's black boxes to Malaysian experts.

MAXIM ZMEYEV/REUTERS

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A Malaysian expert (middle) examines a black box belonging to Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 during its handover from pro-Russian separatists, in Donetsk July 22, 2014.

MAXIM ZMEYEV/REUTERS

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A representative (front L) from pro-Russian separatists and Colonel Mohamed Sakri (front R) of the Malaysian National Security Council exchange signed documents on the handing over of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17's black boxes, in Donetsk July 22, 2014.

MAXIM ZMEYEV/REUTERS

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A representative (front L) from pro-Russian separatists shakes hands with Colonel Mohamed Sakri (front R) of the Malaysian National Security Council after signing documents on the handing over of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17's black boxes, in Donetsk July 22, 2014.

MAXIM ZMEYEV/REUTERS

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A pro-Russian fighter walks past a piece of the crashed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine Monday, July 21, 2014. Four days after Flight 17 was shot out of the sky, international investigators still have had only limited access to the crash site, hindered by pro-Russia fighters who control the verdant territory in eastern Ukraine. Outrage over the delays and the possible tampering of evidence at the site was building worldwide, especially in the Netherlands, where most of the victims were from.

Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

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A man walks past a piece of the crashed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine Monday, July 21, 2014. Four days after Flight 17 was shot out of the sky, international investigators still have had only limited access to the crash site, hindered by pro-Russia fighters who control the verdant territory in eastern Ukraine. Outrage over the delays and the possible tampering of evidence at the site was building worldwide, especially in the Netherlands, where most of the victims were from.

Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

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International forensic experts and members of the OSCE mission speak to the media near the village of Hrabove eastern Ukraine Monday, July 21, 2014. Four days after Flight 17 was shot out of the sky, international investigators still have had only limited access to the crash site, hindered by pro-Russia fighters who control the verdant territory in eastern Ukraine.

Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

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A pro-Russian separatist shows members of the media a black box belonging to Malaysia Airlines flight MH17, before its handover to Malaysian representatives, in Donetsk, July 22, 2014.

MAXIM ZMEYEV/REUTERS

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