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In pictures: Voters prepare for upcoming election in Afghanistan

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An employee of the Afghan Independent Election Commission reviews a voter's documents at a women's voter registration center in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 17, 2014. Nine Afghan presidential candidates are campaigning in the presidential election slated for April 5, 2014. The Taliban have threatened to "use all force" to disrupt the election and warned voters to stay away from the polls.

Rahmat Gul/AP

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An Afghan woman receives her voter registration card from an employee of the Afghan Independent Election Commission at a women's voter registration center in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 17, 2014. Nine Afghan presidential candidates are campaigning in the presidential election slated for April 5, 2014. The Taliban have threatened to "use all force" to disrupt the election and warned voters to stay away from the polls.

Rahmat Gul/AP

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An Afghan woman poses for an identification photograph at a women's voter registration center in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 17, 2014. Nine Afghan presidential candidates are campaigning in the presidential election slated for April 5, 2014. The Taliban have threatened to "use all force" to disrupt the election and warned voters to stay away from the polls.

Rahmat Gul/AP

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An Afghan photographer prepares photographs of women for identification purposes at a women's voter registration center in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 17, 2014. Nine Afghan presidential candidates are campaigning in the presidential election slated for April 5, 2014. The Taliban have threatened to "use all force" to disrupt the election and warned voters to stay away from the polls.

Rahmat Gul/AP

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Supporters of Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul attend a presidential campaign in Kabul March 17, 2014. The Afghan presidential elections will be held on April 5.

OMAR SOBHANI/REUTERS

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Supporters of Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul attend a presidential campaign in Kabul March 17, 2014. The Afghan presidential elections will be held on April 5.

OMAR SOBHANI/REUTERS

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Supporters of Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul hold flags with his photo and his two vice presidents candidate's photos during a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 17, 2014. Writing on the flags read, "Vote for Zalmai Rassoul." Nine Afghan presidential candidates are campaigning in the presidential election scheduled for April 5, 2014.

Massoud Hossaini/AP

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A supporter of Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul sticks flags on his fingers with his photo and his two vice presidents candidate's photos during a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 17, 2014. Writing on the flags read, "Vote for Zalmai Rassoul." Nine Afghan presidential candidates are campaigning in the presidential election scheduled for April 5, 2014.

Massoud Hossaini/AP

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Afghan girls use their phones to take pictures during a campaign for Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul in Kabul March 17, 2014. The Afghan presidential elections will be held on April 5.

AHMAD MASOOD/REUTERS

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Afghan women push to enter a room to register for the upcoming presidential elections in a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.

Anja Niedringhaus/AP

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An Afghan woman peers through a window where women line up to have their picture taken to register for the upcoming presidential elections in a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.

Anja Niedringhaus/AP

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Afghan men line up to have their picture taken to register for the upcoming presidential elections in a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.

Anja Niedringhaus/AP

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Afghan security personnel block a road as Habiba Sarabi (not pictured), one of the running mates to Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul, leaves after a campaign in Kabul March 17, 2014. The Afghan presidential elections will be held on April 5.

AHMAD MASOOD/REUTERS

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In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi, center, shakes hands with a supporter as she arrives to a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan. Sarabi, who already has been the first female governor in Afghanistan, is the most prominent woman running on a ticket in the April 5 election that will mark the first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban. But she faces cultural norms in this deeply conservative Islamic society.

Massoud Hossaini/AP

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In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi, left, holds a boy after he presented her flowers, during a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan. Sarabi, who already has been the first female governor in Afghanistan, is the most prominent woman running on a ticket in the April 5, 2014 election that will mark the first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban. Sarabi’s presence on the ticket with a front-runner in the race points to how candidates and activists are taking unprecedented measures to get out the women's vote since turnout will matter like never before.

Massoud Hossaini/AP

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