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Benghazi Boy Scouts construct about 12 graves a day to keep up with casualties in the civil war, down from 60 graves a day when fighting began in February.

Charla Jones for The Globe and Mail/Charla Jones/The Globe and Mail

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The graveyard is the size of several football fields, but is expected to fill up if fighting continues another two months.

Charla Jones for The Globe and Mail/Charla Jones/The Globe and Mail

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Boy Scout Mohammed El-Bagrmi, 16, is an engineering student who says before the war, they mostly played soccer.

Charla Jones for The Globe and Mail/Charla Jones/The Globe and Mail

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Boy Scout, Mohammed El-Bagrmi, 16, stretches his back before returning to the construction of graves at Benghazi's largest grave site.

Charla Jones for The Globe and Mail/Charla Jones/The Globe and Mail

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Boy Scout, Ahmad Al-Shaykhi, 16, takes a break from the gruelling work of digging graves for the casualties of Libya's civil war.

Charla Jones for The Globe and Mail/Charla Jones/The Globe and Mail

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Khayralla Al-Ammari, 22, and Firas Busnayna, 21, sit over the plot of Mr. Busnayna’s 24-year-old cousin.

Charla Jones for The Globe and Mail/Charla Jones/The Globe and Mail

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