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Missing Malaysia Airlines flight search and rescue efforts

The 11-year-old Boeing, powered by Rolls-Royce Trent engines, took off at 12:40 a.m. (1640 GMT Friday) from Kuala Lumpur International Airport with 227 passengers and 12 crew.

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An oil slick in the seas between Vietnam and Malaysia is seen from the air Sunday March 9, 2014. This is one of the two oil slicks Vietnamese air force spotted Saturday which authority suspected could be from the Malaysian airliner which disappeared Saturday on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Military radar indicates that the missing Boeing 777 jet may have turned back, Malaysia's air force chief said Sunday as scores of ships and aircraft from across Asia resumed a hunt for the plane and its 239 passengers.

AP Photo

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A Vietnamese air force pilot touches the controls of a transport plane on Sunday March 9, 2014 during the search and rescue operations for the Malaysian airliner vanished early Saturday on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Military radar indicates that the missing Boeing 777 jet may have turned back, Malaysia's air force chief said Sunday as scores of ships and aircraft from across Asia resumed a hunt for the plane and its 239 passengers.

AP Photo

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In this photo released by Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency, Director General of the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency Admiral Mohd Amdan Kurish, left, checks a radar during a searching for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane off Tok Bali Beach in Kelantan, Malaysia, Sunday, March 9, 2014. Military radar indicates that the missing Boeing 777 jet may have turned back, Malaysia’s air force chief said Sunday as scores of ships and aircraft from across Asia resumed a hunt for the plane and its 239 passengers.

AP Photo/Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency

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In this photo released by Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency, a patrol vessel of Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency searches for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane off Tok Bali Beach in Kelantan, Malaysia, Sunday, March 9, 2014. Military radar indicates that the missing Boeing 777 jet may have turned back, Malaysia’s air force chief said Sunday as scores of ships and aircraft from across Asia resumed a hunt for the plane and its 239 passengers.

AP Photo/Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency

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China's largest patrol vessel in the South China Sea "Haixun 31" (C) is seen at a port before leaving for search and rescue operations for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, in Sanya, Hainan province. Malaysian officials are poring over CCTV footage and questioning immigration officers and guards at Kuala Lumpur's international airport, concerned that a security breach may be connected to the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

REUTERS

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A view of oil slicks (pale line near the bottom right) spotted in an area of the South China Sea about 100 nautical miles (185 km) from Tok Bali Beach in Malaysia's Kelantan state March 9, 2014. The Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency said it is investigating the oil slicks to determine if they could have come from a missing Malaysia Airlines plane. The missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner may have turned back from its scheduled route before vanishing from radar screens, military officers said on Sunday, deepening the mystery surrounding the fate of the plane and the 239 people aboard.

REUTERS/Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency

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Ignatius Ong, executive official from Malaysia Airlines, speaks during a press conference in Beijing, China, Sunday, March 9, 2014. Military radar indicates that the airline's missing Boeing 777 jet may have turned back, Malaysia's air force chief said Sunday as scores of ships and aircraft from across Asia resumed a hunt for the plane and its 239 passengers.

Vincent Thian/AP Photo

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