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Aung San Suu Kyi began a tour of Europe on Thursday, her first time returning to the continent in 24 years. A last-minute journey to Myanmar in 1988 to tend to her ailing mother was meant to be a round trip, with a return to Britain. But once inside Myanmar, then known as Burma, she was swept up in a popular uprising against military rule and became the leader of a democracy movement that was suppressed and persecuted until last year, when a nominally civilian government came to power in Myanmar. The trip is almost certain to attract the kind of fanfare that will test the patience of the reformist generals now in power after decades of army rule.

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Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi (L) smiles as she attends a news conference with Norway's Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg in central Oslo June 15, 2012. Suu Kyi is on a tour of Europe almost certain to attract the kind of fanfare that will test the patience of the reformist generals now in power after decades of army rule.

Vegard Groett/NTB SCANPIX/REUTERS

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Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi stands on the diplomatic tribune in the Swiss National Council in Bern June 15, 2012. Ms. Suu Kyi, recovering from a brief illness, attended a session of the Swiss Parliament on Friday hours before she was due to fly to Oslo to finally collect her 1991 Nobel Peace Prize.

RUBEN SPRICH/REUTERS

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A portrait of Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (2nd L) hangs alongside those of other Nobel Prize recipients in the Nobel Institute in Oslo June 16, 2012.

CATHAL MCNAUGHTON/REUTERS

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A girl with pictures of Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi stickers on her face attend a concert to honor Suu Kyi after her Nobel Prize acceptance speech at the at the city hall in Oslo, Saturday, June 16, 2012. The Myanmar opposition leader formally accepted the prize that thrust her into the global limelight two decades ago. Suu Kyi says the Nobel Peace Prize she won while under house arrest 21 years ago helped to shatter her sense of isolation and ensured that the world would demand democracy in her military-controlled homeland.

Markus Schreiber/AP

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Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi visits the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway, Saturday, June 16, 2012. Ms. Suu Kyi declared Saturday that the Nobel Peace Prize she won while under house arrest 21 years ago helped to shatter her sense of isolation and ensured that the world would demand democracy in her military-controlled homeland.

Cathal McNaughton/Pool/AP

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Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (C) tours the Nobel Peace centre in Oslo June 16, 2012. Ms. Suu Kyi finally accepted her 1991 Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo on Saturday after spending a total of 15 years under house arrest and said full political freedom in her country was still a long way off.

CATHAL MCNAUGHTON/REUTERS

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Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, center, arrives at the Nobel Institute for a meeting with the Norwegian Nobel Committee in Oslo, Norway, Saturday, June 16, 2012. Ms. Suu Kyi declared Saturday that the Nobel Peace Prize she won while under house arrest 21 years ago helped to shatter her sense of isolation and ensured that the world would demand democracy in her military-controlled homeland.

Cathal McNaughton/Pool/AP

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Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi delivers her Nobel acceptance speech during a ceremony at Oslo's City Hall June 16, 2012. Ms. Suu Kyi finally accepted her 1991 Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo on Saturday after spending a total of 15 years under house arrest and said full political freedom in her country was still a long way off.

Daniel Sannum Lauten/Pool/REUTERS

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Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, on the podium far left, delivers her Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech at the city hall in Oslo, Saturday, June 16, 2012. Ms. Suu Kyi says the Nobel Peace Prize she won while under house arrest 21-years ago helped to shatter her sense of isolation and ensured that the world would demand democracy in her military-controlled homeland.

Markus Schreiber/AP

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Kim Aris, son of Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, sits between his uncle Anthony Aris and Francis Sejersted, who was leader of the Nobel Committee in 1991, as his mother gives her Nobel acceptance speech at Oslo City Hall June 16, 2012. Aung San Suu Kyi finally accepted her 1991 Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo on Saturday after spending a total of 15 years under house arrest and said full political freedom in her country was still a long way off.

Lise Aserud/NTB Scanpix/REUTERS

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Ms. Suu Kyi meets Naw Star Ri during a meeting with the Myanmar community in Bergen June 17, 2012.

NTB SCANPIX/Reuters

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Norway's Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Store, left, welcomes Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi at the Foreign Ministry for a meeting in Oslo, Sunday, June 17, 2012.

Markus Schreiber/AP

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Ms. Suu Kyi poses for a photograph after receiving an honourary degree from Oxford University, in Oxford southern England on June 20, 2012.

Andrew Winning/REUTERS

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Ms. Suu Kyi walks with Britain's Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall in the gardens of Clarence House in central London on June 21, 2012. Arrizabalaga/Pool

Facundo/REUTERS

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Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron and Myanmar Ms. Suu Kyi drink a cup of tea during their visit to Aston Pottery near Witney, southern England on June 22, 2012.

Adrian Dennis/REUTERS

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Ms. Suu Kyi speaks during a meeting with members of the Myanmar community at the Royal Festival Hall in central London on June 22, 2012.

Suzanne Plunkett/REUTERS

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