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The Globe and Mail

Photos: The eel-like fish of Willamette Falls

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Jeremy Red Star Wolf, of the Umatilla Tribe, surfaces with a lamprey from the base of Willamette Falls.

Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press/Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press

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In this photo taken July 8, 2011, shows tribal youth stuffing a lamprey in a net, at Willamette Falls, in Oregon City, Ore. As long as Indians have lived in the Northwest, they have looked to lamprey for food. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press/Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press

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Lampreys move by rhythmically undulating their bodies. They cannot jump, though they can pull themselves over wet surfaces. This means they have trouble navigating the sharp corners and fast currents of fish ladders built for salmon.

Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press/Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press

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They do not have jaws, bones, scales or paired fins, and are not considered true fish.

Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press/Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press

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Lampreys are parasites, feeding off larger sea creatures such as sharks, whales and sea lions, which they latch onto with a ring of sucking teeth.

Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press/Rick Bowmer/The Associated Press

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