Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

Photos: The swearing-in of Tibet's new prime minister

1 of 12

An elderly Tibetan woman holds a Tibetan national flag after the swearing-in ceremony.

Tsering Topgyal/The Associated Press/Tsering Topgyal/The Associated Press

2 of 12

To underline the continuity and legitimacy of Mr. Sangay’s mandate, the Dalai Lama recalled Wednesday that he had long championed for a democratic Tibetan political leadership.

Adnan Abidi/Reuters/Adnan Abidi/Reuters

3 of 12

Mr. Sangay's election is being hailed in various circles as either a break from Tibet's feudal past or just a modest stepwise change.

Tsering Topgyal/The Associated Press/Tsering Topgyal/The Associated Press

4 of 12

Exiled Tibetans varying in ages from the very young to very old gathered en masse for the ceremony.

Ashwini Bhatia/The Associated Press/Ashwini Bhatia/The Associated Press

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 12

Exiled Tibetans look on during the swearing-in ceremony of Mr. Sangay. The ceremony took place in Dharmsala, India.

Ashwini Bhatia/The Associated Press/Ashwini Bhatia/The Associated Press

6 of 12

Mr. Sangay was born abroad and elected among the 100,000 exiles, without input from the six million Tibetans living under Chinese control.

Ashwini Bhatia/The Associated Press/Ashwini Bhatia/The Associated Press

7 of 12

Mr. Sangay, left, stands next the Dalai Lama as he greets the crowd at his swearing-in ceremony. At just 43, Mr. Sangay's election injects some youth in the exile leadership.

Tsering Topgyal/The Associated Press/Tsering Topgyal/The Associated Press

8 of 12

Mr. Sangay, left, speaks with outgoing Prime Minister Samdhong Rinpoche during his swearing-in ceremony. He said the election is "a clear message to the hardliners in the Chinese government that Tibetan leadership is far from fizzling out."

Ashwini Bhatia/The Associated Press/Ashwini Bhatia/The Associated Press

9 of 12

A woman prays with a Tibetan flag outside the ceremony. Beijing has never publicly budged from their position on Tibet, stating Tibetans have no legitimacy or rights to negotiate.

Adnan Abidi/Reuters/Adnan Abidi/Reuters

10 of 12

Monks and townsmen held their hands in prayer at the ceremony. The Dalai Lama said he the Tibertan people are the masters of Tibet and its wrong for religious leaders to hold political authority.

Adnan Abidi/Reuters/Adnan Abidi/Reuters

11 of 12

Townsmen gather in the courtyard of the Tsuglakhang temple, in the northern Indian hill town of Dharamsala, to take part in the swearing-in ceremony for Mr. Sangay.

Adnan Abidi/Reuters/Adnan Abidi/Reuters

12 of 12

The change is also a reminder of the mortality of Tibetan's spiritual leader the Dalai Lama (centre right). The 76-year-old has to prepare for chaotic days of his next reincarnation.

Lobsang Wangyal/AFP/Getty Images/Lobsang Wangyal/AFP/Getty Images

Report an error
Combined Shape Created with Sketch.

Combined Shape Created with Sketch.

Thank you!

You are now subscribed to the newsletter at

You can unsubscribe from this newsletter or Globe promotions at any time by clicking the link at the bottom of the newsletter, or by emailing us at privacy@globeandmail.com.