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The Globe and Mail

Tour the tunnels of Las Vegas, far from the Strip

In the tunnels and sewers beneath Sin City, many of the city's estimated 12,000 homeless have fashioned makeshift shelters

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The historic 1959 "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas" neon sign is located in the median of The Strip at the south end of Las Vegas Boulevard as a landmark for tourists to stand beside for photographs in Las Vegas.

Mona Shield Payne for the Globe and Mail

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Cynthia Goodwin, 46, walks through the wet and muddy passageway from her makeshift home inside the underground storm drain tunnels east of the Las Vegas Strip near Tropicana in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Goodwin and her husband have been living in the tunnels for over two years.

Mona Shield Payne for the Globe and Mail

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Cynthia Goodwin, 46, greets her husband, Richard Ethridge, 39, with a smile as they meet inside the underground storm drain tunnels east of the Las Vegas Strip near Tropicana in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Goodwin and her husband have been living in the tunnels for over two years.

Mona Shield Payne for the Globe and Mail

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Richard Ethridge, 39, and Cynthia Goodwin, 46, who have been married for 13 years, take a break and rest in their makeshift home inside the underground storm drain tunnels east of the Las Vegas Strip near Tropicana in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Wednesday, January 9, 2013. Ethridge and Goodwin have been living in the tunnels for over two years.

Mona Shield Payne for the Globe and Mail

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Using a paint bucket for a chair, John Aitcheson, 53, hangs out in his makeshift home in the underground storm drain tunnels on the west side of the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013. Aitcheson has been living in the tunnels for over two years.

Mona Shield Payne for the Globe and Mail

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