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The Canadian, U.S. and British governments have come to a similar conclusion after sharing intelligence about the deadly crash of a Ukrainian plane in Tehran: it was an Iranian missile that did it.

Iran, though, disagrees.

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“One thing I can tell you is the plane was not hit by a missile,” Ali Abedzadeh, the head of Iran’s Civil Aviation Authority, said in a press conference. He said Western governments should show “courage” and share with Iran the intelligence that led to their conclusion.

Canadian crash investigators are on their way to Tehran to try to figure out what happened.

It’s not clear what they will actually find at the crash site. CBS News is reporting that they sent a crew to the site and found it already picked clean of wreckage.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

The U.S. House of Representatives has approved a resolution that President Donald Trump is not to order further military strikes against Iran without Congressional approval. The vote was mostly along party lines. The Senate is preparing to make a similar vote, which could pass if a few Republicans break ranks as they are suggesting they might.

Canada’s monthly jobs report shows there was a rebound in employment in December, that made up for many of the losses of November.

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Some veteran Conservative MPs from Western provinces say they hope the next leader of their party will not stoke the flames of Western resentment that have been set by provincial premiers on the Prairies.

Lisa Raitt, former deputy leader of the Conservative Party and co-chair of the current leadership race, has joined Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce as vice-chair of global investment banking.

John Crosbie, one of the most quotable ministers in Brian Mulroney’s government, has died at the age of 88.

And Meghan of the royal family has departed for Canada, leaving Prince Harry and other stunned family members in Britain after the couple announced this week they were doing their own Brexit.

Andrew Coyne (The Globe and Mail) on what Canada can do after the plane crash: “The answer, of course, is nothing. There is, alas, very little we can do. That, amid the sorrow and the confusion, is the overriding impression left by recent events – of Canadian impotence, even irrelevance. That is not a criticism of this or any Canadian government; it is merely a blunt reality.”

Dennis Horak (The Globe and Mail) on renewing Canada-Iran relations: “It would be a welcome outcome if this incident provided new impetus to the effort to resume diplomatic ties and a return to Tehran in due course, taking into account the broader geopolitical context. There is no substitute for being on the ground. Canada has been blind to what has been happening in Iran – especially important these past several days – and we have our hands tied in dealing with this tragedy.”

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Doug Saunders (The Globe and Mail) on the legacy of the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war: “After eight years of total warfare whose forms of brutality had not been seen since the First World War, the Iran-Iraq war would end with nothing gained by either side. More than half a million young men died. Its grisly aftermath would shape almost everything about the future life of Iran and Iraq, and also of the United States, whose entanglements with both countries would shape its political and military life for decades.”

John Ibbitson (The Globe and Mail) on the Conservative leadership race: “As the race for the leadership of the Conservative Party gets under way, the likely contestants fall into two categories: those who could win the party, but maybe not the country, and those who could win the country, but maybe not the party.”

Anne T. Donahue (The Globe and Mail) on being a modern member of the Royal Family: “Two years ago, princess-dom felt like the shot of Meghan walking up a cathedral aisle to greet her prince and exchange their vows. But today, it looks like an abrupt ‘hell no’ to living within a toxic establishment, a reclamation of one’s self amid the mythos that accompanies the royal family. It looks like Meghan Markle getting to be a person, not a princess. It looks like a couple opting to a forge a new path instead of sticking to what’s familiar and expected. Ultimately, it looks new.”

Carolyn Harris (The Globe and Mail) on this not being the future challenge the Royal Family has faced: "But in the long, rich history of the monarchy, Harry and Meghan aren’t even the first royal family members with ties to Canada to consider stepping back from their duties in pursuit of lives that were very different from the expected pattern of public engagements. And, through all those familial dramas, one thing has remained intact: The monarchy – the vital institution itself – has adapted, survived and thrived.”

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