Skip to main content

Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor speaks during an announcement at UBC in Vancouver, on April 23, 2019.

JONATHAN HAYWARD/The Canadian Press

Months after first promising money to a cancer research network bearing Terry Fox’s name, the federal health minister touted the spending at an event Thursday.

The infusion $150 million in federal funding over five years will help build a network of top-tier cancer researchers whose aim will be to advance the science of individually customized cancer treatments, known as precision cancer medicine.

This emerging treatment uses big data, new technologies like genomics, and artificial intelligence to design individual treatments for patients based on the biological and genetic makeup of their cancer.

Story continues below advertisement

The federal funding to the Terry Fox Research Institute, first unveiled in this year’s federal budget, will be matched by the network’s partners to develop the $300-million cancer research initiative called the Marathon of Hope Cancer Centre Network.

Federal Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor highlighted the five-year federal spending at an event in Moncton on Thursday.

In a statement, she said the government is “committed to supporting innovative and collaborative cancer research to improve health outcomes for Canadians who are living with, or may one day be affected by, cancer.”

She called the initiative and its partners “a source of hope to cancer patients and their families and friends.”

A consortium of five regional cancer care and research centres from Atlantic Canada to British Columbia are expected to participate in the initiative.

Although it is designed to help individualize treatment, precision medicine requires vast amounts of data – specifically the genetic information of hundreds of thousands of people – to provide researchers with the tools and knowledge to determine which treatment will deliver the best outcomes.

Researchers expect to build a high-quality, shareable data set of 15,000 cancer cases by 2023 as part of their work.

Story continues below advertisement

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies