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Third time the charm for sale of Bloor West home

Done Deal, 24 Kenway Rd., Toronto

24 KENWAY RD., TORONTO

ASKING PRICE $1,090,000

SELLING PRICE $1,075,000

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PREVIOUS SELLING PRICE $240,000 (1994)

TAXES $4,816 (2016)

DAYS ON THE MARKET Two

LISTING AGENT Kimmé Myles, Royal LePage Real Estate Services Ltd., Johnston and Daniel Division

The Action: This 1 1/2-storey house appeared on the market in May just a few weeks after the provincial housing changes were unveiled. Listed initially at $998,000, then at $1.175-million, it received two offers, one of which subsequently fell apart and the other was rejected outright. It was relisted again in June at an asking price of $1.09-million and drew a swift and solid offer of $1.075-million.

"The [new] rules affected buyers in a hugely psychological way, so there was a bit of a lull at that time," agent Kimmé Myles said. "In hindsight, had my seller been ready to list in April, it would have been a different scenario, but thankfully he was realistic and understood the changing dynamics of the market. But I wasn't going to let him give it away and ultimately, in the end, both he and I were happy … and relieved."

What They Got: An architect customized this 1950s home on a 50-by-120-foot lot, so it is noticeably different from its neighbours. The kitchen is partly glass-enclosed and there are dark plank laminate floors throughout. There are two bedrooms above ground and a third in the lower level.

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The main floor has a fairly standard layout with a front living room, a rear dining space, with a back door to the fenced-in yard.

There's also an attached garage.

The Agent's Take: "The big selling point was the lot with its pretty trees and landscaping and also its position on the street. It stood out like a gem," Ms. Myles said. "[Plus] we're in an area that's just a five-minute walk to the subway and about three minutes to a park."

While many older homes are often razed, this one is in better shape. "It was owned by an architect, so the finishes, attention to details and unique features, like drop ceilings … made it very desirable," Ms. Myles said.

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