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After the flood: Reconstructing damaged banknotes

At a lab in Mainz, Germany, specialists reconstruct and verify water-damaged euro banknotes so owners can be reimbursed

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A forensic scientist opens a plastic pack containing euro banknotes which were damaged during the recent floods, at the money analyzing laboratory of Germany’s Federal Reserve bank, Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz, July 31, 2013. The 13-member analyzing team specialize in the reconstruction of damaged or destroyed banknotes. Once the banknotes are verified, the Bundesbank will transfer the money back to the owner's account, while the damaged notes will be burned.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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A forensic scientist inspects euro banknotes which were damaged during the recent floods, at the money analyzing laboratory of Germany’s Federal Reserve bank, Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz, July 31, 2013. Within eight weeks after the heavy floods in eastern and southern Germany, more than 100,000 banknotes worth more than €3-million ($4.1-million) were sent to be examined. Last year the laboratory checked more than 840,000 banknotes worth over €32-million.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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A forensic scientist inspects euro banknotes damaged and stuck together during recent floods in Germany, at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz, July 31, 2013. The 13-member analyzing team specialize in the reconstruction of damaged or destroyed banknotes.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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Forensic scientists Uwe H. and Frank H., inspect euro banknotes which were damaged during the recent floods, at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank. Once the banknotes are verified, the Bundesbank will transfer the money back to the owner’s account, while the damaged notes will be burned.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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Flood-damaged euro banknotes are gently prised apart at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank in Mainz, July 31, 2013.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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Banknotes damaged during recent floods in Germany are laid out for inspection at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz July 31, 2013. Reconstructing the notes is a painstaking and time-consuming task.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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Forensic scientists Uwe H. and Frank H. inspect euro banknotes damaged by recent flooding in southern and eastern Germany, at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz July 31, 2013. The 13-member analyzing team specialize in the reconstruction of damaged or destroyed banknotes.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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Euro banknotes damaged by recent flooding in Germany are delicately pried apart at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz July 31, 2013. Within eight weeks after the heavy floods in eastern and southern Germany, more than 100,000 banknotes worth more than €3-million ($4.1-million) were sent to be examined.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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A forensic scientist inspects flood-damaged euro banknotes at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz July 31, 2013. Once the banknotes are verified, the Bundesbank will transfer the money back to the owner’s account, while the damaged notes will be burned.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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A forensic scientist holds up a reconstructed €50 banknote, held together with Scotch tape, damaged during recent flooding in Germany, at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz, July 31, 2013. Once damaged banknotes are verified, the Bundesbank will transfer money back to the owner’s account, while the damaged notes will be burned.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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Adhesive tape is employed to reconstruct a €50 banknote damaged in recent flooding in southern and eastern Germany at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz, July 31, 2013.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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A seal is put around reconstructed and counted €50 banknotes damaged during the recent flooding in Germany, at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz, July 31, 2013. The 13-member analyzing team specialize in the reconstruction of damaged or destroyed banknotes. Once the banknotes are verified, the Bundesbank will transfer the money back to the owner’s account, while the damaged notes will be burned.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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Reconstructed and counted €50 banknotes damaged during recent flooding are sealed at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz, July 31, 2013. After the banknotes have been verified, the Bundesbank transfers money back to the owner’s account, and the damaged notes are burned.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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Ready for the incinerator. A wad of reconstructed and counted €50 banknotes damaged during recent flooding in Germany lie on a table in front of a sign reading ‘Flutgelt,’ or flood money, at the money analyzing laboratory of Deutsche Bundesbank, in Mainz, July 31, 2013. Once the banknotes are verified, the Bundesbank transfers money back to the owner’s account, while the damaged notes are burned. Within eight weeks after the heavy floods in eastern and southern Germany more than 100,000 banknotes worth more than €3-million ($4.1-million) were sent to be examined. Last year the laboratory checked more than 840,000 banknotes worth over €32-million.

KAI PFAFFENBACH/REUTERS

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