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The Canadian B-schools that made the Top 100 of Financial Times executive MBA rankings

The Financial Times executive MBA survey measures a broad set of indicators, including salary growth after an EMBA, student satisfaction with the program helping them achieve their career goals and rise in seniority post-graduation.

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Led by York University's Schulich School of Business, six Canadian institutions were recognized in the top 100 list of executive MBA programs for 2012 by the Financial Times.

Schulich offers its program in partnership with the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University in Illinois, with their joint program ranked first in Canada for the sixth straight year, and 27th overall this year.

Among programs offered through consortia – a growing trend noted in the survey – the Kellogg-Schulich EMBA placed 10th in the world. The program also had a top 17th finish in a number of sub-categories, including published faculty research, the diversity of the student body, the level of work experience among studies and the amount of classroom teaching hours carried outside the country where the program is offered.

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In the global ranking, the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management ranked in 29th place. Among other Canadian schools, the Ivey School of Business at the University of Western Ontario was in 43rd spot, followed two places later by a joint program offered by Queen's University School of Business and the Johnson School of Management at Cornell University in New York in 45th place. A separate Queen's program came in 92nd spot, followed by a joint program from the business schools of the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary in 99 th place.

Rotman slipped only one spot from last year's survey, but the other Canadian schools lost a little more ground in the rankings from 2011. For instance, the Schulich-Kellogg program was 11th overall last year, while the joint program of the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary was in 73rd spot last year.

One reason for the year-to-year shift among schools globally is the growing muscle of programs offered by business schools in China, according to the FT survey. This year, six of the top 12 executive education programs were offered at schools in China, in conjunction with more established business schools from the United States and Europe, compared to only three in 2011. A joint program offered by the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University and INSEAD of France, soared to fourth spot this year without being ranked in previous years.

The survey measures a broad set of indicators, including salary growth after an EMBA, student satisfaction with the program helping them achieve their career goals and rise in seniority post-graduation.

The survey also gives a profile of the faculty, including the portion of those with PhDs and the gender split among professors. For example, women account for 21 per cent of the faculty teaching the executive education program at the Kellogg-Hong Kong UST School of Business, compared to 22 per cent at Schulich-Kellogg and 25 per cent at Rotman.

Follow Jennifer Lewington and Business School News by subscribing to an RSS feed here.

Contact Jennifer at jlewington@bell.net.

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