Skip to main content

Brian Culbert competes in events like the Utra-Trail du Mont-Blanc, a gruelling 119-kilometre run over mountains in France, Switzerland and Italy. He turned the races into fundraising activities for SickKids and so far has raised $255,000.

giorgio1978/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The gift: Raising $255,000 and climbing

The cause: SickKids Hospital in Toronto

When Brian Culbert's son Matthew was born, he had a skin disorder so serious that doctors weren't sure he would survive.

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Culbert and his wife, Denise, spent weeks at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children holding their son and hoping for the best. Remarkably, Matthew recovered, and while his skin is still sensitive, he's an active 17-year-old who enjoys a multitude of sports.

Mr. Culbert, an investment adviser at CIBC Wood Gundy in Toronto, vowed to do something to give back to the hospital. Years later, having discovered a passion for long-distance cycling and running, and with the help of his friend and coach, Dave Battison, Mr. Culbert began competing in events such as the Utra-Trail du Mont-Blanc, a gruelling 119-kilometre run over mountains in France, Switzerland and Italy. He turned the races into fundraising activities for SickKids and so far has raised $255,000. The proceeds help fund a program to train nurses in Ghana.

Mr. Battison died in 2015, but Mr. Culbert, 57, has pledged to keep going in honour of his friend, his son and the hospital. "I'm trying to pick the next challenge," he said. "And the challenge is always twofold: one is to survive the race, but more importantly to draw attention to this amazing program that's evolving in Ghana."

Dealing with sexism in the workplace is never easy. A reader asks: I am one of two women at a small tech start up that often operates like a frat house. How do I handle sexist jokes and comments when we don’t have an HR department?
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter
To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies