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Effective training requires some show and tell

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The best way to start to train a novice in any field or to develop good instructional materials is for the expert to actually do the tasks in question, says Harvard Business Review.

How many times have you trained a colleague in a task, only to have that person come knocking on your door every five minutes with a question?

People learn by watching others, so instead of telling people how to solve a problem, show them. Take them through each step, explaining the reasons behind each. Then allow them to ask as many questions as needed.

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This will not only give them the foundation they need to do the task, but will prompt you to master the task more deeply as you provide a justification for each step.

This management tip was adapted from The Best Approach to Training by Richard Catrambone.

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