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Riots continued Wednesday after the country stepped back from the brink of default by voting in favour of a sweeping austerity program that will pave the way for fresh bailout loans at the risk of plunging the country into deeper recession

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An anti-austerity protester holds a Greek flag as he confronts riot police in front of the parliament in Athens June 29, 2011. Greece's parliament looked increasingly likely to approve unpopular austerity measures on Wednesday, despite violent protests, to secure international funds to prevent the euro zone's first sovereign default. REUTERS/John Kolesidis (GREECE - Tags: CONFLICT SOCIETY POLITICS BUSINESS)

JOHN KOLESIDIS/John Kolesidis/Reuters

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Protestors clash with riot police during a 48-hour general strike in Athens on June 29, 2011. Protestors clashed with police, who fired tear gas early on June 29, several hours before the Greek Parliament was to vote on an austerity package. The vote on a 28.4 billion-euro (40.8 billion US dollar) package of taxes, spending cuts and sell-offs is crucial for Greece to secure international aid to stave off bankruptcy, which is threatening the stability of the eurozone. AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS (Photo credit should read ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

ARIS MESSINIS/Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

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A bleeding protester is treated following clashes with the police in Athens June 29, 2011. Anti-austerity protesters attempted to block streets leading to the parliament where later today, Greece's parliament holds a crucial vote on whether to submit the country to a fresh wave of unpopular austerity measures as it attempts to avoid a debt default. REUTERS/John Kolesidis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST EMPLOYMENT)

JOHN KOLESIDIS/John Kolesidis/Reuters

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Protestors clash with riot police during a 48-hour general strike in Athens on June 29, 2011. Protestors clashed with police, who fired tear gas early on June 29, several hours before the Greek Parliament was to vote on an austerity package. The vote on a 28.4 billion-euro (40.8 billion US dollar) package of taxes, spending cuts and sell-offs is crucial for Greece to secure international aid to stave off bankruptcy, which is threatening the stability of the eurozone. AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS (Photo credit should read ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

ARIS MESSINIS/Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

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Protestors clash with riot police during a 48-hour general strike in Athens on June 29, 2011. Protestors clashed with police, who fired tear gas early on June 29, several hours before the Greek Parliament was to vote on an austerity package. The vote on a 28.4 billion-euro (40.8 billion US dollar) package of taxes, spending cuts and sell-offs is crucial for Greece to secure international aid to stave off bankruptcy, which is threatening the stability of the eurozone. AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS (Photo credit should read ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

ARIS MESSINIS/Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

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A policeman sprays tear gas as a protester walks away during an anti-austerity rally in Athens June 29, 2011. Anti-austerity protesters attempted to block streets leading to the parliament where later today, Greece's parliament holds a crucial vote on whether to submit the country to a fresh wave of unpopular austerity measures as it attempts to avoid a debt default. REUTERS/Panagiotis Tzamaros (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)

STR/Panagiotis Tzamaros/Reuters

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An anti-austerity protester throws a bag of garbage at riot police in Athens June 29, 2011. Greece's parliament looked increasingly likely to approve unpopular austerity measures on Wednesday, despite violent protests, to secure international funds to prevent the euro zone's first sovereign default. REUTERS/John Kolesidis (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)

JOHN KOLESIDIS/John Kolesidis/Reuters

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Anti-austerity protesters set up roadblocks as they attempt to block streets leading to the parliament in Athens June 29, 2011. Greece's parliament looked increasingly likely to approve unpopular austerity measures on Wednesday, despite violent protests, to secure international funds to prevent the euro zone's first sovereign default. REUTERS/Panagiotis Tzamaros (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW)

STR/Panagiotis Tzamaros/Reuters

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