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In Pictures: The 87th Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York

Cold and wind could not stop this crowd favourite that started in 1924 when it was called the Macy’s Christmas Parade.

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The Spider-Man balloon floats down Central Park West during the 87th Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York. When the parade began in 1924, it was called the Macy’s Christmas Parade and featured live animals from the Central Park Zoo marching along with Macy's employees.

GARY HERSHORN/REUTERS

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An Uncle Sam balloon floats down Sixth Avenue. It wasn't until 1927 that the parade included balloons.

ERIC THAYER/REUTERS

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A partly deflated dreidel balloon is tended to along New York's Central Park West. There had been some concerns about whether the wind would keep the 16 giant balloons grounded.

TINA FINEBERG/AP

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The Sonic the Hedgehog balloon makes it way down New York's Central Park West. The balloon got caught on a tree while rounding a corner near the start of the parade route; handlers used cutters on a rope to free it.

TINA FINEBERG/AP

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A parade participant walks down Sixth Avenue. Jim Leyland, former manager of the Detroit Tigers, served as grand marshal.

ERIC THAYER/REUTERS

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Handlers try to control a candy cane balloon as the wind blows it over on Sixth Avenue. Balloon handlers were keeping a tight grip on their inflated characters and held them fairly close to the ground in tree-lined areas. The wind was around 26 mph.

ERIC THAYER/REUTERS

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The Papa Smurf balloon floats down Sixth Avenue. The first balloon, an inflated Felix the Cat, was introduced into the parade in 1927.

ERIC THAYER/REUTERS

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Logan Berg, 5, of Mount Olive, New Jersey, foreground, reacts as he and others watch the parade as it makes it's way down New York's Central Park West. The cheering throngs were bundled against a 30-degree chill, but the sun was shining.

TINA FINEBERG/AP

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A Pikachu balloon floats down Sixth Avenue. More than 50 million people were expected to tune into the parade on TV.

ERIC THAYER/REUTERS

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The Happy the Hippo balloon floats down Sixth Avenue.

ERIC THAYER/REUTERS

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