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The Globe and Mail

In Pictures: The people, places and tragedies of the garment industry

From Bangladesh to Cambodia, workers toil to produce the ubiquitous T-shirt

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Rescue workers attempt to rescue garment workers from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building.

REUTERS

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People rescue a garment worker who was trapped under the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building.

ANDREW BIRAJ/REUTERS

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Bashir Ahmed was the floor manager at New Wave Styles in the Rana Plaza garment factory building that collapsed in Savar, Bangladesh. ‘Four or five us were standing together, talking. Then suddenly everything started going down.’

AMIRUL RAJIV/The Globe and Mail

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Raehana Akhter, a 22-year-old mother who worked as a quality control officer for about $2 a day, was in the Rana Plaza garment factory building that collapsed in Bangladesh. ‘It was like stepping into an elevator [shaft]. I felt this feeling in my stomach, and then everything fell.’

AMIRUL RAJIV/The Globe and Mail

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Officials stand guard amid efforts to clear rubble after a portion of the roof of the Taiwanese-owned Wing Star Shoe Co. Ltd. factory collapsed in Cambodia, killing two people and injuring several more.

LAUREN CROTHERS/The Globe and Mail

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A child is seen in a residential area adjacent to the Dignity Knitter garment factory in Sa’ang District, Kandal province, Cambodia. Factory workers rent small rooms in the compound – which has one water pump and four squat toilets – for just a few dollars a month.

LAUREN CROTHERS/The Globe and Mail

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Sao Sreyyon, 29, sits in the cement room adjacent to the Dignity Knitter garment factory that she rents with her sister. The room fits one wooden bed frame and a few personal items.

LAUREN CROTHERS/The Globe and Mail

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One of the production warehouses in the Dignity Knitter garment factory in Sa’ang District, Kandal province, Cambodia.

LAUREN CROTHERS/The Globe and Mail

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One of the production warehouses in the Dignity Knitter garment factory.

LAUREN CROTHERS/The Globe and Mail

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A block of shared squat toilets serves the entire Dignity Knitter garment factory compound.

LAUREN CROTHERS/The Globe and Mail

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One of the production warehouses in the Dignity Knitter garment factory in Cambodia.

LAUREN CROTHERS/The Globe and Mail

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Bruce Rockowitz, who is originally from Vancouver, is the chief executive officer of Li & Fung, the clothing industry’s largest middleman

Lam Yik Fei/The Globe and Mail

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