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David Keane, president of the B.C. LNG Alliance, addresses the Vancouver Board of Trade energy forum in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday October 8, 2014.

DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Exxon Mobil Corp. has become the seventh member of the B.C. LNG Alliance, joining the trade association as it ramps up efforts to promote the province's fledgling liquefied natural gas industry.

Irving, Tex.-based Exxon Mobil and its Canadian unit, Imperial Oil Resources Ltd., are in the early planning phase for the West Coast Canada LNG project at Tuck Inlet, located near Prince Rupert in northwestern British Columbia.

"We are committed to working with the provincial and federal governments in developing a regulatory and fiscal framework that sets the right conditions in place to establish a globally competitive and thriving LNG sector in B.C.," alliance president David Keane said in a statement Wednesday.

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There have been 18 B.C. LNG proposals announced so far, though no venture has made a final investment decision yet to forge ahead.

Exxon Mobil, through its affiliate, Exxon Mobil LNG Market Development Inc., said nurturing long-term relations will be crucial.

"If the project is developed, the potential investment in the British Columbia and regional economy would create increased local employment and expand economic opportunities for northern communities, First Nations and the province as a whole," Exxon Mobil said.

Richard Guerrant will serve as Exxon Mobil's representative on the B.C. LNG Alliance's board.

The other six alliance members are Petronas-led Pacific NorthWest LNG, Royal Dutch Shell PLC-led LNG Canada, Chevron Corp.-led Kitimat LNG, BG Group's Prince Rupert LNG and two small-scale projects, Triton LNG and Woodfibre LNG.

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