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In photos: Inside the Boart Longyear plant in Mississauga

Report on Business takes a tour of the drill maker's plant in Mississauga, one of seven busy factories the company runs across the world

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An employee prepares metal rods at the Boart Longyear plant in Mississauga that will be used in future drilling operations. The Utah-based company produces steel drill rods, drill bits and drills used in mining operations across the world.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Despite recent slowdowns in the commodity market, the drills and drill bits made at Boart Longyear’s seven worldwide plants, including the Southern Ontario location, are in high demand.

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Boart Longyear CEO Craig Kipp stands near one of the drills the company produces at the plant in Mississauga.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Boart Longyear sells 80 per cent of its drills and services to the world’s top 20 mining firms. The rest go to junior miners.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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CEO Craig Kipp talks about the preparation of the various metal rods at the Boart Longyear plant in Mississauga. Despite global economic turmoil, Mr. Kipp said the company has not seen a significant change in demand for its products.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Mr. Kipp looks over the drill testing centre. He has run the company since 2008, and changed the production line so it can react to changes in the commodity cycle.

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The drill testing centre at the Boart Longyear plant in Mississauga. While demand for the company's products remains high, shares have dropped from last year’s peak by about 30 per cent.

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Most of Boart Longyear’s share losses started in early May when the prices of gold, copper and other metals retreated.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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CEO Craig Kipp. Drillers admit that parts of the industry have been hit hard, especially junior miners that have cut back on exploration throughout the past year.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Metal rods manufactured at the Mississauga Boart Longyear plant. Some driller companies, including Boart Longyear and Geodrill, are banking on West African nations to continue to drive exploration growth.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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