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The proposed pipeline has become a symbolic dividing line for opponents and supporters of Canada's oil sands

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Demonstrators for and against the Keystone XL pipeline gather outside Pershing Auditorium near the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb.

Nati Harnik/AP

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Demonstrators for the Keystone XL pipeline, right, and a demonstrator against the pipeline meet outside Pershing Auditorium near the state Capitol in Lincoln, Neb.

Nati Harnik/AP

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Jane Kleeb, one of the leading campaigners against the Keystone XL pipeline, has helped to organize hundreds of people to attend meetings that she calls "the last stand" against the project.

Nathan Vanderklippe/The Globe and Mail

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Participants listen to testimony on the Keystone XL pipeline at the Pershing Auditorium in Lincoln, Neb.

Nati Harnik/AP

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Lin and Marie Gumb look out over their ranch in the Nebraska Sandhills, where grasses grow over top of a vast plain of sand and dune.

Nathan VanderKlippe/The Globe and Mail

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A small red flag marks the path of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline across Leon Weichman's hay fields, which are irrigated from the waters of the massive Ogallala aquifer.

Nathan VanderKlippe/The Globe and Mail

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Cattle graze in the early morning on fields kept green by the Ogallala aquifer, a vast water source that lies in the path of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.

Nathan VanderKlippe/The Globe and Mail

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