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The Globe and Mail

Foreign business booms in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Investment in Africa from BRIC nations is bringing luxury homes, retail shops and resource development to the continent's copper belt

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Mark Crandon of Russia’s Renaissance Partners, centre, is standing with local employes Albert Mukomba, directeur general, left, and Yannick Kitambo, assistant de director, right, on the land where a large property development will be built outside Lubumbashi in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Salome Mwape lives in the village of Kintu, which is located in the middle of the land Renaissance Partners intends to develop.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Many people of Kintu Village told the Globe’s Geoffrey York they are worried they will be evicted when the project breaks ground.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Lubumbashi is also home to the Chemaf copper and cobalt processing plant. The plant is Indian-owned.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Chemaf has been the subject of much criticism from the Congolese who live near its factories.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Chemaf has operated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for 10 years.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Many Congolese living near Chemaf’s main factory report pollution from sulphuric acid and dust.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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The factory does employ many locals.

John Lehmann/John Lehmann/Globe and Mail

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The chief of security works at the Chemaf copper and cobalt processing plant in Lubumbashi.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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A worker loads a truck at the Chemaf factory.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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A Chemaf truck is seen through a window covered in dust at the factory.

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Dominique Sango was burned in an acid spill when a truck from the Chemaf plant crashed into his home in Lubumbashi.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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