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Khartoum airport tries to burnish its image

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Passengers queue to check in at Khartoum’s international airport in this file photo. Facing public outrage over a string of aviation accidents, Sudanese officials have overhauled the civil aviation body by splitting off supervision in line with global standards.

MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH/REUTERS

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A general view of Khartoum’s international airport is shown in a Sept. 13, 2012, file photo. There are plans to build new airports and add more routes.

MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH/REUTERS

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This video frame grab image taken from Sudan TV via AP Television News shows a plane that burst into flames after apparently veering off a runway in Khartoum June 10, 2008.

AP

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Passengers check in at the airport in this file photo. The civil aviation authority also decided to produce a marketing video that insists flying in Sudan is safe.

MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH/REUTERS

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Passengers arrive at the Khartoum airport. The marketing video explains how an aging Fokker that crashed last year landed with its wheels up and turned on its side, but all 45 passengers survived.

MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH/REUTERS

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A worker gestures instructions on the tarmac. One of Africa’s oldest carriers, Sudan Airways used to fly to London and Frankfurt until the European Union banned it over its safety record.

MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH/REUTERS

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