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In Pictures: World's longest high-speed rail line debuts in China

Despite problems, including a crash that killed 40 people in July 2011, China's ambitious rail construction program is on track to meeting its 2015 target of 18,000 kilometres.

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CRH380 (China Railway High-speed) Harmony bullet trains are parked at a high-speed train maintenance base in Wuhan, Hubei province, Dec. 25, 2012. China inaugurated the world’s longest high-speed rail line on Dec. 26, from Beijing to Guangzhou, a distance of 2,298 kilometres.

Darley Shen/Reuters

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Attendants pose for pictures inside a high-speed train during an organized experience trip from Beijing to Zhengzhou on Dec. 22, 2012. The new link more than halves the travel time from Beijing in the north to the economic hub of Guangzhou in southern China. The trip will take about eight hours.

China Daily/Reuters

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An employee uses a flashlight to inspect a CRH380 Harmony bullet train at a high-speed train maintenance base in Wuhan, Hubei province Dec. 24, 2012. The high-profile rail program has faced problems, including the collapse of part of a line after heavy rains in March of this year.

Darley Shen/Reuters

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A CRH train begins its Beijing-Shanghai high speed rail service from a station in Beijing, China on June 30, 2011. A bullet train crash in July of that year killed 40 people and led to funding shortages for the rail construction program.

AP

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A CRH Harmony bullet train pulls into the Shenyang Railway Station in Shenyang, Liaoning province July 31, 2012. Trains on the latest high-speed line will initially run at 300 kilometres per hour.

Sheng Li/Reuters

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A resident rides a tricycle past a CRH Harmony bullet train outside an exhibition for the Seventh World Congress on High Speed Rail in Beijing Dec. 7, 2010.

Jason Lee/Reuters

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A journalist poses for a photo in front of a high-speed train at Beijing West Railway station Dec. 22, 2012. More than 150 pairs of high-speed trains will travel the newest line every day.

China Daily/Reuters

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An employee hoses down a CRH Harmony bullet train at the high-speed train maintenance base in Wuhan, Hubei province Oct. 19, 2011.

Stringer/china/Reuters

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An attendant stands inside a high-speed train during an organized experience trip from Beijing to Zhengzhou Dec. 22, 2012. The opening of the new line brings the total distance covered by the country’s high-speed rail lines to more than 9,300 kilometres.

China Daily/Reuters

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