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In Eastern Europe, clothing designers attract investors as well as buyers

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Hungarian fashion designer Kati Zoob, right, inspects a model wearing her creation in Budapest. Around emerging Europe, where garment assembly for Western brands has been a thriving business for years, there is a new confidence that local designs also have a chance on the world stage.

BERNADETT SZABO/REUTERS

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A woman looks at clothes by new local label Attitude at a store in Budapest. With wages still low compared to other regions – including Asia, where costs have ballooned – retailers are moving business back to eastern Europe, meaning a big influx of orders and a new investment in infrastructure.

BERNADETT SZABO/REUTERS

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A model wears a creation by Hungarian designer Renata Gyongyosi during a fashion show in Budapest. Local manufacturers are also helped by the potential for expansion in domestic markets such as Poland and Russia which, though huge, are much less saturated than in the West.

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Fashion designers Bori, left, and Rozi Vaczi, creators of local label Matyo Design, sit outside a traditional house in the village of Tard, 148 kilometres east of Budapest.

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Seamstresses work at a garment assembly factory of Kezmu, a Hungarian company that manufactures clothes for new label Attitude, in Budapest. Daniel Csereklyei, who operates the company, which employes 5,000 people, says many international fashion houses are returning production to Eastern Europe from areas such as China.

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Clothes and accessories are displayed in a store of new local label Attitude in Budapest.

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Fashion designer Bori Vaczi, co-creator of local label Matyo Design, presents the traditional clothes of the Matyo people in the village of Tard.

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A reflection shows a model presenting a creation in the showroom of Hungarian designer Kati Zoob in Budapest.

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A seamstress works on a creation of Matyo Design, which uses hand-sewn traditional patterns on modern pieces of clothing, in Tard.

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Women try on clothes by local label Attitude at a store in Budapest. The growth in Eastern European clothing lines also extends to Poland, where fashion companies like LPP, the creator of the brand Reserved, have grown rapidly and in some markets even taken on giants like Spain’s Inditex, the world’s top fashion retailer and parent of Zara.

BERNADETT SZABO/REUTERS

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Models wait for their turn on the catwalk during a fashion show in Budapest June 3, 2012.

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Clothes are displayed in the showroom of Hungarian fashion designer Kati Zoob in Budapest.

BERNADETT SZABO/REUTERS

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