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Along the coast of northern England, crippling fishing quotas, climate change and overfishing has all but crushed the local fishing industry. For skipper Howard Locker, it's a discouraging end to a life at sea.

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Small fishing boats dry out in the morning sun by the quayside in Whitby, northern England, Feb. 27, 2013. Whitby, once a busy fishing port, is now a shadow of its former self.

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Fishermen Malcolm Ward, left, and Colin Jenkinson enjoy a pint at their local pub The Newcastle Packet in Scarborough, northern England, Feb. 26, 2013. Scarborough is not far from Whitby, where only 200 people are now employed in fishing, and the fleet is down to just a few boats.

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Youths wait for fish and chips at a local chip shop in Scarborough.

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A man feeds seagulls with his leftover chips by the quayside in Whitby.

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The tide comes in as the sun sets on the seafront in Scarborough. Global warming has expanded fish habitats northward, with fish stocks sometimes disappearing for weeks on end.

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Fishing boats dry out in the mid-morning sun at the quayside in Scarborough.

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Skipper of the Whitby Rose, Howard Locker, chats aboard his trawler in the North Sea, off the coast of Whitby, Feb. 28, 2013.

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Mr. Locker, one of the last remaining trawlermen in the area, sorts his catch aboard his trawler. A combination of crippling fishing quotas, climate change and overfishing has all but crushed the local fishing industry.

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A baby shark is seen aboard the Whitby Rose in the North Sea.

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Mr. Locker, his son Craig, left, and trainee fisherman Simon Kidd sort the catch aboard his trawler. Boats return from sea with largely empty nets, and the atmosphere is sour.

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Craig Locker prepares breakfast aboard the Whitby Rose in the North Sea. Often schools of fish reappear unpredictably, resulting in bumper catches and causing jubilation – but then European Union quotas kick in and force fishermen to dump excess catch in the sea to avoid hefty fines.

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A ‘No Fishing’ sign is painted onto the quayside in Scarborough.

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Crab and lobster pots dry out in Whitby.

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A couple looks at what is on offer at Sandgate Seafoods, a local fish shop in Whitby.

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The Whitby Rose chugs back to port in Whitby.

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The moon sets over Whitby harbour Feb. 28, 2013.

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