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Peruvian protesters oppose proposed Newmont gold mine

A $4.8-billion project in the Andes is being opposed by residents who fear their water supply could become contaminated

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Protesters march during the second day of strike against Newmont's proposed $4.8-billion Conga gold mine, at the Peruvian city of Cajamarca.

ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/REUTERS

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An Andean woman walks next to police officers during the second day of strike against Newmont's proposed $4.8 billion Conga gold mine at the Peruvian city of Cajamarca.

ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/REUTERS

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Demonstrators hold candles during a protest in Lima against Newmont's proposed $4.8-billion Conga gold mine in Cajamarca, Peru.

PILAR OLIVARES/PILAR OLIVARES/REUTERS

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Peruvian police officers guard near machinery of Newmont's proposed $4.8-billion Conga gold mine to protect it from protesters near the Cortada lagoon in the Andean region of Cajamarca.

ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/REUTERS

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Andean people gather after a march against Newmont's proposed $4.8-billion Conga gold mine, at the El Perol lagoon in the Peruvian region of Cajamarca. Protesters and farmers say the mine would cause pollution and hurt water supplies by replacing a string of alpine lakes with artificial reservoirs.

ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/REUTERS

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Peruvian police officers guard vehicles and machinery of Newmont's proposed $4.8-billion Conga gold mine to protect it from protesters near the Cortada lagoon in the Andean region of Cajamarca.

ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/REUTERS

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Andean people rest before a march against Newmont's proposed $4.8 billion Conga gold mine. Peru’s central government has called the environmental plan for the project sound and the Denver-based company said it was exhaustively researched and designed according to strict standards.

ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/REUTERS

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An Andean drinks water from the Cortada lagoon during a protest against Newmont's proposed $4.8-billion Conga gold mine, in the Peruvian region of Cajamarca. Protesters and farmers say the mine would cause pollution and alter sources of irrigation water by replacing a string of alpine lakes with artificial reservoirs.

ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/ENRIQUE CASTRO-MENDIVIL/REUTERS

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