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The Globe and Mail

Steel workers leave their marks atop World Trade Center

Construction workers and invited visitors at the One World Trade Center in New York have left personal messages on the structure's steel beams. Their messages, including one from U.S. President Barack Obama, will be invisible once the building is finished. Here's a look at those marks of passage.

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In this Aug. 2, 2012 file photo, a construction worker signs a ceremonial steel beam at One World Trade Center in New York. The beam, having since been adorned with the autographs of workers and police officers at the site, will be sealed into the structure of the tower, which is scheduled for completion in 2014.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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This Jan. 15, 2013 photo shows graffiti left by Michael Chertoff, the former director of Homeland Security, on a steel column on the 104th floor of One World Trade Center in New York. Construction workers finishing New York’s tallest building are leaving their personal marks on the concrete and steel in the form of graffiti.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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One World Trade Center, center, rises above the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York, in this Sept. 6, 2012 file photo.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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In this Jan. 15, 2013 photo, “Antony,” left his graffiti on a steel column on the 102nd floor of One World Trade Center.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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Autographs cover a wall on a top floor of One World Trade Center in New York.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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This Jan. 15, 2013 photo shows Spanish graffiti left by a worker on a steel column on the 104th floor. The phrase means, ‘I love you three steps above heaven.’

Mark Lennihan/AP

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Iron workers Steven Cross, right, and Adam Cross talk after placing iron columns on the 100th story of One World Trade Center in New York, April 30, 2012. The addition of iron columns to the 100th story pushed the height of One World Trade above that of the Empire State Building.

Lucas Jackson/Reuters

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This Aug. 2, 2012 file photo shows U.S. President Barack Obama’s message and signature on a steel beam at One World Trade Center in New York. The president’s words join those of numerous construction workers at the site.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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On Aug. 2, 2012, iron workers James Brady, left, and Billy Geoghan release the cables from a steel beam after connecting it on the 104th floor of One World Trade Center. The beam was signed by President Barack Obama and will be sealed into the structure of the tower, which is scheduled for completion in 2014.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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This Jan. 15, 2013 photo shows graffiti left by visitors to the World Trade Center on a steel column on the 104th floor. Relatives of victims were allowed to visit and leave names and comments on the beams.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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This Jan. 15, 2013 photo shows a drawing on the 104th floor.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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A tribute to Lilian Fredricks was left by a construction worker on a steel column on the 104th floor. Ms. Fredericks was among the 2,700 who died in the 2001 terror attacks.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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The graffiti, thoughts and comments will disappear as New York’s tallest building gains its drywall, ceiling panels and paint.

Mark Lennihan/AP

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The moon rises behind the skyline of Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center as people stand along the Hudson River in Jersey City, Oct. 1, 2012.

© Gary Hershorn/Reuters

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