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Diamond Aircraft in London, Ont., saw a sales increase of 33 per cent last year for its single- and twin-engine aircraft. It also has a jet model under development.

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Avionics technicians Derek Dunn, left, and Shaun Courtepatte install a relay into a twin engine plane at Diamond Aircraft, in London, Ont. The company employs just under 200 workers in a factory that used to build de Havilland Mosquito fighters during the Second World War.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Ildiko Bajnoczi assembles a wiring harness using a test board. Diamond Aircraft makes single and twin engine aircraft, and has a jet aircraft model in development. Prices start at $179,800 (U.S.).

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Muhsen Musa preps an engine cowling before painting it. In 2011 Diamond Aircraft increased sales by 33 per cent, delivering 185 units versus 139 units in 2010.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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A DA40 model painted in a customer's colours is ready for delivery. Diamond's fuel-efficient planes are used widely by flight schools.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Stewart Clarke uses a small mirror and flashlight to inspect components inside the D-JET's engine.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Jerry Jaroszewski polishes a newly painted wing flap. In February 2012 the company announced an order for 26 DA40s to be delivered to Flight Training Adelaide in Australia.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Rick Letness inspects the installation of an instrument panel. The company's twin-engine four-seater DA42 starts at $624,500 and the D-JET model at $1.89-million.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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While a plane is being built it undergoes several inspections before it's ready for flight. Diamond Aircraft has sold planes in Canada, the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, India, China, Europe, South America, South Africa, Mexico and Turkey.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Greg Watson holds a diamond tip with a 0.8mm diameter; a mixture of sand and water is forced through the tip at a pressure of 60,000 psi to cut steel and other materials.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Greg Watson removes metal from a water cutter used to make precision cuts in various types of steel.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Sean Kelly polishes a wing after it has been painted. In March 2012 Diamond Aircraft delivered six of 12 DA20s to the Ecuador Air Force.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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