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Scroll through photos of the 2012 Challenge Contest semi-finalists

Six judges selected four semi-finalists after receiving 1200 entries from across Canada

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Chris, Walter and Zenon Klopick, co-owners of Tenderloin Meat & Sausage, a family business specializing in home-made lunch meats, sausages and selling only the best cuts of fresh meat, photographed in their Winnipeg location Wednesday, June 6, 2012.

John Woods/The Globe and Mail

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Co-owner Zenon Klopick’s 27-year-old business specializes in home-made lunch meats and sausages.

JOHN WOODS/john woods The Globe and Mail

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Chris, Walter and Zenon Klopick, co-owners of Tenderloin Meat & Sausage, a family business specializing in home-made lunch meats, sausages and selling only the best cuts of fresh meat, photographed in their Winnipeg location Wednesday, June 6, 2012.

John Woods/The Globe and Mail

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Webster Tobias hangs freshly made smokies at Tenderloin Meat & Sausage, a family business specializing in home-made lunch meats, sausages and selling only the best cuts of fresh meat, in Winnipeg Wednesday, June 6, 2012

John Woods/The Globe and Mail

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Voices.com CEO David Ciccarelli reviews a weekly workflow board.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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David Ciccarelli says Voices.com’s Challenge is to attract more foreign language business.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Voices.com serves companies from small businesses to Fortune 500 companies by providing voice actors for radio and television commercials, web videos, audio books, games and other forms of digital audio media.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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A few of the 25 workers at Voices.com relax with a friendly game of foosball inside their London Ontario offices.

Mark Spowart/mark spowart The Globe and Mail

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Rob Botman, General Manager of Glassopolis Specialty Glass, inside the company's glass-cutting and warehousing facility in Toronto.

Tim Fraser/tim fraser The Globe and Mail

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In order to cut certain types of glass, a plastic sheeting that coats the glass is removed by manually burning it with kerosene by Glassopolis workers.

Tim Fraser/tim fraser The Globe and Mail

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Glassopolis employee Carl Bidaisee moves a crate of glass using a forklift to the storage area of the company's warehouse in Toronto.

Tim Fraser/tim fraser The Globe and Mail

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An employee moves a piece of newly cut glass at Glassopolis Specialty Glass which currently has 20 employees.

Tim Fraser/tim fraser The Globe and Mail

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Ralph DeBoer, right and Joshua Bulk of Rosa Flora Limited in Dunnville stand among some of their 110 varietals of Gerbera.

Glenn Lowson/glen lowson The Globe and Mail

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Rosa Flora Limited of Dunnville is hoping to customize their flower packaging system to give their customers greater control.

Glenn Lowson/glenn lowson The Globe and Mail

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Gary Chappell moves a cart with packaged Gerbera in the busy sorting areas of Rosa Flora which hopes to customize its ordering system.

Glenn Lowson/glenn lowson The Globe and Mail

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Ima Coca Coca is one of 138 employees at the Dunnville firm which sells in a very competitive international market.

Glenn Lowson/glen lowson The Globe and Mail

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