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Basketball Former NBA MVP Steve Nash says life is busier than ever after basketball

Steve Nash remains a consultant to the Golden State Warriors.

Tijana Martin/The Canadian Press

Broadcaster, businessman, consultant, filmmaker and basketball legend, Steve Nash’s life is busier than ever at 45.

Did we mention father of five?

Nash has ownership stakes in both the Vancouver Whitecaps and Real Mallorca, which has won promotion back into the Spanish top tier. In his second year with Turner Sports, he is involved in both its NBA and soccer coverage. He also is co-founder of CTRL, a media company that focuses primarily on sports.

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And he remains a consultant to the Golden State Warriors.

“I’m not a great delegator, so I kind of have it all on my phone and in my head,” said Nash when asked about his crowded schedule.

“My No. 1 passion and priority is being a dad,” added Nash, whose children range from a six-week-old newborn to 14-year-old twins. “And so I try to do everything around their schedule. ... And I try to limit my travel where I can or include them.

“All in all, we make it work. But it’s busy and I think the process of incorporating so many different interests and endeavours continually needs to be refined and asking questions why and how. So it is a work in progress but I’m doing a lot of things I love to do.”

In other words, as throughout his playing career, Nash’s game is evolving.

The Hall of Famer was in town to promote DAZN, which has added the English Premier League to its sports streaming service in Canada. It also allows Nash – a fervent Tottenham fan – to watch Real Mallorca, the team he bought into in early 2016 along with the Phoenix Suns ownership group and former U.S. soccer players Stu Holden and Kyle Martino.

The Spanish team was in the second division at the time and was relegated to the third tier before climbing back up the ladder.

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“It’s been incredible,” said Nash, who goes to Spain three times a year to get a first-hand look at his team.

Nash, whose playing career ended due to wear and tear on his back, looks fit and trim in retirement.

“I feel pretty good,” he said. “My back bugs me every day a little bit. Some days, though, I’m flying and some days I’m not moving so well. But I can’t sit still so I exercise and play sports every day pretty much.

“I’m pretty diligent doing my exercises and prep so that I can play. I could be better at it. It’s just a huge part of who I am, so I’m very active still. But there definitely are times when I’m not in best of conditions. But overall I’m good enough to play at the weekend warrior level.”

Nash officially retired in March, 2015, his play restricted due to nerve damage in his back. He stepped away as a Laker after stints with Phoenix (twice) and Dallas when he realized that while he could still play, he couldn’t do it regularly at a high enough level.

“It took me two years to realize that,” said Nash, who grew up in Victoria and now makes his home in the Los Angeles area.

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A two-time MVP and eight-time all-star, the stylish playmaker was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame last September.

“Looking back, I never would have guessed that I’d get to play 18 seasons. I’m incredibly fortunate. It’s strange though, because in those last year and a half, two years when I was really struggling, I really wanted it so bad. As bad as ever. I put so much time and effort into trying to play as long as I could.

“And I was kind the last to know, the last to see. But in a sense it leaves me with no regrets.”

Like other observers, Nash watched the migration of NBA free agents with interest this summer as stars banded together in a bid to form new dynasties.

“I’m fine with it. I think it’s a natural evolution of the market and the league and its globalization and the amount of attention and social media. The players are starting to figure out that they are irreplaceable pieces in this machine so they are flexing their muscle, so to speak.”

He believes the league and players association will adapt and find common ground as needed.

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“If there’s need to be change, which you could argue for sure, it’s also been exciting. It’s made the NBA in many ways a 12-month league,” he said.

Asked whether he’d like to expand his ownership portfolio into the NBA, Nash says he’s interested, but options are limited.

“There’s 30 franchises. ... The way the game’s going, the success of the league and the visibility, the profile of the teams, the owners, I don’t think too many people want to get out of that right now.”

While he says his deal as a consultant with the Warriors is an informal year-to-year affair, he expects to be back. “We’ll see in the next month or so.”

His ties to Golden State made for mixed emotions in the NBA Finals, although he says his loyalty was to the Warriors.

“But what a thrill to see the Raptors win and Canada explode like that,” he said.

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The way the entire country embraced the Toronto team during its remarkable playoff run left him “very proud,” he added.

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