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Key moments in the history of the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees:

1920: In January, Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sells Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $100,000 (U.S.) plus a loan, using Fenway Park as collateral. According to legend, Frazee uses the money to help bankroll a musical. The Red Sox, who won their fifth World Series in 1918, haven't won a World Series since. Ruth became a Hall of Famer and the Yankees have won 26 World Series.

1974: The Red Sox make the first formal bid for free-agent pitcher Jim (Catfish) Hunter and think they have him locked up until the Yankees sign him to a five-year, $2.85-million (U.S.) contract. Hunter plays a pivotal role in two World Series wins.

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1978: Yankee shortstop Bucky Dent, who hit 40 home runs in 4,512 major-league at-bats, hits a three-run pop-fly homer in the seventh inning of a one-game playoff against the Red Sox and the Yankees come back from a 2-0 disadvantage for a 5-4 win.

1986: Mookie Wilson's grounder rolls between Bill Buckner's legs with two out in the bottom of the ninth inning, scoring Ray Knight and helping the New York Mets stave off elimination with a 6-5 win in Game 6 of the World Series. The Red Sox blow a 3-0 lead in an 8-5 loss in Game 7, the fourth time they have lost Game 7 in four trips to the Series since trading Ruth.

2003: Leading 5-2 in the eighth inning of Game 7 of the American League Championship Series, Red Sox manager Grady Little leaves a failing Pedro Martinez in the game. The Yankees tie the score and win 6-5 when Aaron Boone homers off Tim Wakefield on the first pitch of the 11th inning.

2003-04: A proposed trade in December sending Alex Rodriguez from the Texas Rangers to the Red Sox is scuttled when Boston ownership can't rework Rodriguez's contract without decreasing its average annual value, making it unacceptable to the players' union. Needing a replacement for Boone, who injured a knee playing pickup basketball, the Yankees trade for Rodriguez.

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