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Pyeongchang 2018: Figure skating team wins Canada’s first gold medal of Winter Olympics

PYEONGCHANG 2018

Figure skating team wins Canada's first gold medal of Winter Olympics



Canada’s athletes hug after they won the figure skating team event title during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung, on Feb. 12, 2018.



What you missed

  • For today’s Olympic guide, please go here
  • Canada’s mighty figure skating team is won Canada’s first gold in the team event at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Sunday evening
  • Laurie Blouin snagged a silver medal in the women’s slopestyle event Sunday evening
  • Justine Dufour-Lapointe won silver in women’s moguls, following her gold in Sochi
  • Canada’s Ted-Jan Bloemen eked out a silver medal in men’s 5000m speed skating, separating himself from Sverre Lunde Pedersen of Norway by .002 seconds
  • Canada’s John Morris and Kaitlyn Lawes booked their ticket to the inaugural mixed doubles curling final Sunday night when they defeated Norway 8-4 in the first semifinal. They will play in the final on Feb. 13 at 6:05 a.m. ET




What happened on Feb. 11


Canada’s Gabrielle Daleman (front C) reacts after competing in the figure skating team event women’s single skating free skating during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung on February 12, 2018.

Figure skating (Team event: men's and women's free skate, free dance)

Canada's mighty figure skating team is guaranteed gold in the team event at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Sunday evening, before participating in the pairs free dance. The team had an insurmountable lead of 63 points after Gabrielle Daleman finished her ladies free dance and grabbed eight points for Canada. The Olympic Athletes from Russia will take silver, and U.S. leads Italy for bronze with one event to go. Three-time world champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, Canada's flag bearers in opening ceremony, will anchor Canada's team.

Laurie Blouin of Canada poses with Canadian flag before the flower ceremony.

Snowboard (Women's slopestyle final)

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Canadian snowboarder Laurie Blouin won a silver medal Sunday night in the women's slopestyle. Sporting a black eye after a nasty crash in training a few days ago, Blouin overcame high winds to nail a clean second run for 76.33 points. The reigning world champion from Stoneham, Que., Blouin was second behind American Jamie Anderson, who scored 83.00 on her first run. Enni Rukajarvi of Finland took bronze with a score of 73.91. Fellow Canadians Brooke Voigt of Fort McMurray, Alta., finished 21st and Spencer O'Brien of Courtenay, B.C., was 22nd.

Speed skating (Men's 5000m)

Sven Kramer of the Netherlands dominated the men's 5000m speed skating, winning gold and setting an Olympic record in the process at 6:09.76. Canada's Ted-Jan Bloemen eked out a silver medal, separating himself from Sverre Lunde Pedersen of Norway by .002 seconds. Peter Michael of New Zealand finished in fourth. Seung-Hoon Lee of the host country South Korea led through the first half of the competition with a time of 6:14.15 but he was ultimately knocked off of the podium by the speed skating heavyweights in the second half.

Ted-Jan Bloemen of Canada competes in the men’s 5000m speed skating event at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Freestyle skiing (women's moguls final)

Justine Dufour-Lapointe nabbed silver in women's moguls, following her gold medal performance four years ago in Sochi. France's Perrine Laffont won gold and Yulia Galysheva of Kazakhstan took home bronze. Dufour-Lapointe was joined in the final run by fellow Canadian Andi Naude, who was unable to complete her run. Justine's sister Chloe, who won silver at the Sochi Olympics, made the finals, but was unable to progress past the first round.

Women's ice hockey (Canada vs. Russia)

To start its gold-medal defence, Canada's women's hockey team rolled to a convincing 5-0 victory over the Olympic Athletes from Russia. Melodie Daoust and Rebecca Johnston scored two goals apiece, while Haley Irwin added another. Canada will next face Finland on Feb. 13. Canada beat the United States in overtime in 2014 and both countries are the favourites to make it back to the finals.

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Curling (Mixed doubles semifinal)

Canada's John Morris and Kaitlyn Lawes booked their ticket to the inaugural mixed doubles curling final Sunday night when they defeated Norway 8-4 in the first semifinal. After struggling with the speed of the ice in the first few ends, Lawes made a hit to score three in the seventh before Norway conceded to give Canada the win. Canada will await the winner of the game between Olympic Athletes from Russia and Switzerland Monday morning. The final goes Monday night at 7 p.m. ET.


What's happening on Feb. 12


  • 5:10 a.m. and 7 a.m.: Biathlon (Women’s 10km pursuit, Men’s 12.5km pursuit)
  • 5:50 a.m.: Luge (Women’s singles: runs 1-2)
  • 7 a.m.: Freestyle skiing (Men’s moguls final)
  • 7:05 p.m.: Curling (Mixed doubles: Bronze medal match)
  • 8 p.m.: Snowboard (Women’s halfpipe final)

In case you missed it



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  • As Team Korea falls in a blowout hockey game, fans ask whether North and South should skate together, Nathan VanderKlippe reports

FOLLOW THE GLOBE IN PYEONGCHANG


With files from Canadian Press

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