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A digital fork, and other new and strange gadgets at CES

Please note, some of the products shown at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas may never make it to the consumer market.

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A Japanese reporter with TV Asahi tries out the HAPIfork, a fork that keeps track of the number of fork servings you take, measures how fast you are eating and alerts the user with lights and vibration if you are eating too fast.

RICK WILKING/REUTERS

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The $49.00 WeMo light switch by Belkin can be controlled wirelessly with a smart device, and is expected to be in stores this summer.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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A smart phone with HzO Waterblock technology is dipped in beer at the opening press event of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 6, 2013. The system is currently marketed at manufacturers but may have future consumer applications, a representative said.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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Jim Sanduski, Vice President of strategic product marketing for Sharp Electronics, speaks in front of an ICC Purios Ultra HD television at their news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 7, 2013. Sharp introduced new television technology and devices made with IGZO technology (Indium gallium zinc oxide) which promises ultra-high screen resolution with very low power usage. The TV is expected to ship in the summer of 2013.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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A model holds a Sharp IGZO Tablet Aquos Pad at their news conference during the Consumer Electronics Show.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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A woman demonstrates the Nectar mobile power source, which will charge and power a mobile device for up to two weeks.

RICK WILKING/REUTERS

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A 12-button Gila GX Gaming Series mouse by Genius. The extremely precise mouse can record up to 72 macro keys per button, a representative said, and retails for $99.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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A Parrot Flower Power wireless device is displayed on top of an iPad. The device monitors conditions of your plants and sends a visual alert if a plant needs attention. The device is expected to be available by the end of 2013 but a price has not been set.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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A Netatmo urban weather station the personal indoor and outdoor weather station monitors a variety of conditions and sends the information to your wireless device. The $179 system is available online and is expected in retail stores in a few months.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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