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Fuji’s first interchangeable lens compact camera is a joy to use, but it’s hard to pay a premium for the sake of size when you can get better functionality from cameras that are almost half the price. Here's a closer look at how the camera performs.

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The X-Pro1 is Fuji's succesor to the X100, a diminuitive, fixed-lens compact camera with a retro-inspired design. Both cameras sport a faux-leather body, and from afar could easily be mistaken for high-end Leicas. It's clear that Fuji has again taken the time to make the X-Pro1 look good.

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The downside is that the camera is also quite heavy — which doesn't always lend itself well to the fashionable design. Despite its slimmer profile and seemingly compact size, the X-Pro1 is about as wide and litle less heavy than my old Canon 30D DSLR, which makes one-handed shooting difficult without a more traditional DSLR-style grip.

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The camera also sports a 3-inch LCD screen that is incredibly sharp. It appears to have a much higher pixel density than your average display.

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The Fuji X-Pro1 with a wide-angle 18mm f/2.0 lens, a 35mm f/1.4 – that, when the sensor’s crop-factor is taken into account, is about equivalent to a 50mm lens – and a 60mm f/2.4.

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Finally, this wide-angle shot was captured with the Fuji X-Pro1's 18mm f/2.0 lens on a sunny day in San Francisco.

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This image was captured with the Fuji's 35mm f/2.0 lens.

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This image was captured with the Fuji's 60mm f/2.4 lens, which offers a closer level of zoom.

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The camera boasts a 6fps burst shooting mode, which is useful for action shots or difficult to capture moments.

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Another example of the sort of scenes that can be captured with the X-Pro1's burst shooting mode.

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ISO sensitivity can be set to a staggering 25600 without adversely affecting image quality, which can be useful in very dark indoor scenes such as this.

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The Fuji X-Pro1's image sensor can produce images with very impressive dynamic range, such as this scene, where artificial indoor light and brighter outdoor light are balanced without issue.

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The 35mm f/1.4 lens offers a very narrow depth of field, which is great for zeroing in on small details in a scene.

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Again, impressive depth of field is possible with the Fuji's initial line of prime lenses.

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The 18mm wide-angle lens is excellent for capturing large scenes or vistas where it might be otherwise difficult to fit everything — or everyone — in.

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