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Weird and wacky inventions at the Consumer Electronics Show

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The HAPIfork, made by HAPILABS, smart electronic fork is seen on display at the Consumer Electronics Show on Tuesday, Jan. 8 in Las Vegas. The fork vibrates and lights up to help its user slow down to a healthy eating pace.

Julie Jacobson/AP

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The iPotty for iPad potty training device is see on display at CES on Wednesday. No app is available to go with the trainer, but the idea is to keep the child on the toilet for as long as necessary by keeping them digitally entertained.

Julie Jacobson/AP

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Goldfish swim around a tablet displayed in a waterproof case at the DryCase booth CES on Wednesday.

Jae C. Hong/AP

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Eric Mazzini slices celery on top of a Kindle protected with an Invisible Phone Guard (IPG) covering at CES on Tuesday. The company makes the scratch-proof, self-healing protective covers for over 600 devices. Prices range from $12.95 to $24.95 depending on the model.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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Markus Wells dips an iPad into a bowl of water at the LifeProof booth at CES on Tuesday. The LifeProof Nuud cases, which retail for $129.99, are waterproof to 6.6 feet, Mr. Wells said.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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Electric Friend Minis are displayed at the Noetic booth at CES on Tuesday. The animal-shaped speakers with retractable cords are expected to be in stores this spring.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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A woman demonstrates a conceptual virtual fitting room by LG, where a customer will be able to see themselves wearing different clothes on screen, at CES on Wednesday.

RICK WILKING/REUTERS

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Alvaro Patino tries out Celluon's Magic Cube, a projection keyboard for mobile devices at CES on Wednesday.

Jae C. Hong/AP

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Claire Hobean, operations manager for Re-Time, models the Re-Timer at CES on Wednesday. The product helps reset your body clock by shining a green 500 nanometer light over your eyes. The product is beneficial for frequent fliers and shift workers, she said. The Australian company just released the Re-Timer in Australia for $282.67 (U.S.) and will launch in the U.S. this week.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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Murata Boy, a bicycle riding robot, rides a bike at the Murata booth at CES on Tuesday.

Jae C. Hong/AP

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Eric Rudder, chief technical strategy officer of Microsoft, holds a prototype Windows smartphone with a flexible OLED display during Samsung's keynote address at CES on Wednesday.

Jae C. Hong/AP

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The Mondo Spider, a mechanical spider powered with hydraulics, is moved around its exhibit space by eatArt creator Ryan Johnston at CES on Wednesday.

Julie Jacobson/AP

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Industry affiliates try out a display of massage chairs at CES on Wednesday.

Julie Jacobson/AP

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An ATM is demonstrated at the Verizon booth at CES on Wednesday.

RICK WILKING/REUTERS

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A football helmet equipped with pressure sensors that sends data to a remote computer using Verizon technology is displayed at the Verizon booth at CES on Wednesday.

RICK WILKING/REUTERS

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Steven Stepansky demonstrates a bed with a pressure sensitive pad that sends data to the cloud as it monitors a person’s sleep using Verizon technology, at the Verizon booth at CES on Wednesday.

RICK WILKING/REUTERS

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Devices are charged using a ChargeCard at CES on Wednesday. The flat USB charging cable for iPhone 4 and Android devices is only slightly thicker than a credit card and is made to fit into a wallet. The cards, costing $25.00, are expected to be available in 3 to 5 weeks, said company CEO Noah Dentzel.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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A game of roulette is played during a demonstration on the Lenovo IdeaCenter Horizon 27-inch table PC at CES on Wednesday.

Julie Jacobson/AP

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Julie Jackson demonstrates on the Samsung Smart Touch remote at the Samsung booth at CES on Tuesday.

Jae C. Hong/AP

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An application vendor displays his wares at CES on Wednesday.

RICK WILKING/REUTERS

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Dancers perform during a Samsung Electronics keynote address CES on Wednesday. Samsung introduced a new faster processor and prototype devices with flexible OLED screens.

STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS

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