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Looking back on Steve Jobs's legacy with Apple

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Steve Wozniak, 26, and high school friend Steve Jobs, 21, launch Apple Computer from the Jobs family garage in Silicon Valley. 1976

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The company soon introduced the Apple I for a ticket price of $666.66. They quickly earned $774,000 in sales. A year after launching their company, they launched the Apple II, seen here in 1977. The next few years would be turbulent for the young entreprenuer. Sales climbed 700 per cent to $139-million by 1980, when Apple Computer became a publicly traded company. But following models suffered from quality issues and consumers balked at the company's 1984 offering, the Macintosh. By 1985, Jobs resigned from the company.

The Associated Press/AP Photo/The Associated Press/AP Photo

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He'd go on to start another tech company called NeXT, Inc., and invest heavily into what later became Pixar Animation Studios. By 1997, Apple bought NeXT, Inc. for $429-million and Jobs rejoined his former company as CEO.

John G. Mabanglo/AFP/Getty Images/John G. Mabanglo/AFP/Getty Images

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Mr. Jobs announced he would join the board of directors at the MacWorld Expo in Boston on Aug. 6, 1997. He also announced Microsoft will invest $150-million to purchase non-voting stock in Apple forging a new allience between the two companies.

John Mottern/AFP/Getty Images/John Mottern/AFP/Getty Images

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FILE - This 1998 file photo provided by Apple shows Apple CEO Steve Jobs holding an iMac computer. Apple Inc. on Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011 said Jobs is resigning as CEO, effective immediately. He will be replaced by Tim Cook, who was the company's chief operating officer. It said Jobs has been elected as Apple's chairman. (AP Photo/Moshe Brakha, File)

Moshe Brakha/The Associated Press/Moshe Brakha/The Associated Press

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Apple Computer Inc. founder Steve Jobs poses with the company's new Power Mac G4 Cube, after his keynote adddress at the Macworld Conference and Exposition in New York on July 19. The G4 Cube, which Jobs said combines the power of the Power Mac G4 with the style and miniaturization of an iMac, comes in an 8-inch cube suspended in a clear enclosure.

Peter Morgan/Reuters/Peter Morgan/Reuters

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Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new Apple release in Cupertino, California October 23, 2001. The new MP3 music player packs up to 1,000 CD-quality songs into an ultra-portable, 6.5 ounce design that fits in your pocket.

Susan Ragan/Reuters/Susan Ragan/Reuters

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Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduces the newly redesigned iMac computer during his keynote address at the Macworld Conference and Expo 2002 in San Francisco January 7, 2002. The new iMac features a 15-inch LCD flat screen that floats in the air allowing users to easily adjust its height or angle. REUTERS/

Lou Dematteis/Reuters/Lou Dematteis/Reuters

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Apple Computer Inc. chief executive Steve Jobs gestures with the album of singer Bob Dylan, in background, during Apple's launch of their new online "Music Store" in San Francisco, Monday, April 28, 2003. Apple's new music service draws from five major record labels offering more than 200,000 songs at 99 cents a download. (AP Photo)

The Associated Press/The Associated Press

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Apple CEO Steve Jobs displays his company's new product, the Mini-Ipod, at the Macworld Conference and Expo in San Francisco, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2004. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Marcio Jose Sanchez/The Associated Press/Marcio Jose Sanchez/The Associated Press

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Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new iPhone during his keynote address at MacWorld Conference & Expo in San Francisco, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2007. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)

Paul Sakuma/The Associated Press/Paul Sakuma/The Associated Press

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Mr. Jobs speaks during a special event Sept. 9, 2009 in San Francisco, California. Apple debuted iTunes 9 during the presentation.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Apple CEO Steve Jobs presents the iPad at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010.

Marcio Jose Sanchez/The Associated Press/Marcio Jose Sanchez/The Associated Press

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Paul Sakuma/The Associated Press/Paul Sakuma/The Associated Press

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Paul Sakuma/The Associated Press/Paul Sakuma/The Associated Press

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